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Helen Ross: Rory McIlroy urges caution in comparisons

“I don’t know (what to make of the comparisons with Tiger Woods),” said Rory McIlroy.

Ross: McIlroy urges caution in comparisons

Rory McIlroy wore a red shirt and dominated the final round, just like you-know-who used to. But, says Helen Ross, McIlroy is the first to urge caution to those making comparisons.

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 10:57 p.m.

By Helen Ross, PGATOUR.COM Chief of Correspondents

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. — Rory McIlroy wouldn’t have worn red on Sunday if he had been paired with “him.” But he wasn’t so McIlroy did, and the young Northern Irishman ended up doing a pretty darn good impression of one Tiger Woods.

McIlroy was positively flawless as he lapped the field at the Ocean Course, making an emphatic birdie on the 18th hole and winning the 94th PGA Championship by a record eight strokes. His first major came by the same margin at Congressional in 2011 and with the Wanamaker Trophy to go with that U.S. Open title, McIlroy is already halfway to the career Grand Slam.

And he is just 23 years old, some four months and seven days younger than Woods was when he won his second major at the 1999 PGA Championship. Woods was the 10-year-old McIlroy’s idol back then, and now the newly-minted, baby-faced PGA champ will be inspiring kids just like he was back then.

Granted, McIlroy has a ways to go to catch Woods, who has 12 more majors and 70 more PGA TOUR titles on his resume. But on this signature Sunday on a toney island just off the South Carolina coast the comparisons have begun in earnest, even if McIlroy was quick to urge caution.

“I don’t know (what to make of the comparisons),” he said. “I mean, I’ve won my second major at the same age. But he went on that incredible run like 2000, 2001, 2002 and won so many. I’d love to sit up here and tell you that I’m going to do the same thing, but I just don’t know. It’s been great to win my first major last year and to back that up with another one this year. I can’t ask for any more.

“I just want to keep working hard, keep practicing and hopefully there’s a few more of these in my closet when my career finishes.”

During his pre-tournament interview on Wednesday McIlroy had said he’d give his season, one that included a win at The Honda Classic and a playoff loss in Charlotte, nothing better than a solid B. On Sunday, though, his GPA was off the charts as that grade was revised to an A-plus.

“I think I heard Tiger say, you can have a good season, but to make a good season a great season, you need a major championship,” McIlroy said. “Now I’ve had two great seasons in a row — no matter what happens from here on in. Hopefully I can play some great golf from now until the end of the year and get myself ready for another great season next year, too.”

There’s a lot at stake over the next five months for the gracious and gregarious pro who regained the No. 1 spot in the world on Sunday and looks ready to stay there for a while. McIlroy ranks second to Woods by a mere 177 FedExCup points with the Playoffs starting in just two weeks at another major venue in Bethpage Black. He’s second on the money list, as well.

McIlroy also leads the European Tour’s Race to Dubai, and the possibility of duplicating Luke Donald’s money list double of 2011 now looms as a definite possiblity. Oh, and don’t forget about the Ryder Cup which will be played in Chicago the week after the FedExCup champion is crowned.

But for now, let’s savor Sunday’s accomplishment. McIlroy played 27 holes with the lead and never cracked, not even when the hard-charging Ian Poulter birdied his first five holes or when he pulled within two again with consecutive birdie at Nos. 11 and 12. McIlroy set a target of 13 under and did one better, and no one was catching him.

With the victory, McIlroy silenced his critics, the ones he said were “pushing the panic button” and questioning everything from his work ethic to his love life when he missed three cuts in four starts back in May and June. Turns out, no one is harder on McIlroy than he is on himself, and he didn’t like going home early in his U.S. Open title defense or at THE PLAYERS and Memorial, as well.

“I don’t think I could have answered it in any better way,” McIlroy said. “And yeah, to be honest, it did motivate me. I did want to go out there and prove a few people wrong. That’s what I did. It took me all of four weeks to get my game back in shape and get out of my mini=slump, and this is the result.”

In retrospect, Woods says, McIlroy’s small setback may have been a blessing in disguise. The man many regard as the greatest of all time has answered his own critics in ending a 30-month victory drought with three this year, so he knows whereof he speaks.

“We all know the talent he has,” said Woods, who held a share of the lead entering the weekend but didn’t break par over the final two rounds.”He went through a little spell this year, and I think that was good for him. We all go through those spells in our careers, and you know, he’s got all the talent in the world to do what he’s doing. And this is the way that Rory can play. When he gets it going, it’s pretty impressive to watch.”

Padraig Harrington, who knows a thing or two about winning major championships, feels this second victory will free McIlroy up to realize the lofty expectations that have attended his meteoric rise.

“If he didn’t win the majors, you know, it would have been an underachievement or a letdown or whatever,” Harrington said. “So the pressure was always on him in that sense. He’s only doing what he was destined to do and delivering on that.

“As he saw last year from winning, he won the U.S. Open last year and he has not had an easy ride of it since then. It brings a lot of pressure with it. I think winning his second major is going to make things a lot easier for him. I think he’ll be a better player for winning this time around.”

Harrington said he still expects the 36-year-old Woods to eclipse Jack Nicklaus’ major haul of 18. But he thinks McIlroy has the ability to do the same — and plenty of time to make it happen.

“Rory’s proving that when he plays well, he plays like Tiger played well,” Harrington said simply.

And that’s saying a lot, even if McIlroy is too humble to say the same.

This article: 

Helen Ross: Rory McIlroy urges caution in comparisons

Runner-up David Lynn pulls PGA’s biggest surprise

David Lynn earned invitations to two of next year’s majors, the Masters and the PGA Championship.

Runner-up Lynn pulls PGA’s biggest surprise

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 10:04 p.m.

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — David Lynn hadn’t ever had a reason to play a pro tournament in the United States. Now, the Englishman’s has at least two more big ones after finishing second to Rory McIlroy in the PGA Championship.

Lynn shot his second straight 68 on Sunday to finish at 5-under 283, a whopping eight shots behind McIlroy. But the runner-up finish was good enough to earn invitations to two of next year’s majors, the Masters and the PGA Championship.

Lynn hadn’t played in nearly a month, choosing to protect his spot in the top 100 to see if he might qualify for the year’s final major. The call came last week and the 38-year-old Lynn was on his way to The Ocean Course.

“It’s a little bit surreal right now,” Lynn said.

It must be for someone who hadn’t ever competed in America.

“I’ve never been exempt to play in anything in America, so that’s the reason why I’ve never been over here,” he said. “This is a good start.”

And a nice pay day. Lynn earned $865,000 for second at the PGA Championship, more than double his season’s total of $407,636 in 14 events on the European Tour.

So how does a player whose biography includes the line, “Finished inside The European Tour’s top 90 for a 12th consecutive season in 2011,” make it into the PGA Championship.

Lynn had just missed squeezing in as part of the world’s top 100 several times and, ranked No. 98 this year, didn’t want to slip out. So he shut down his game after the Scottish Open a month ago. He didn’t touch the clubs, he said, for about two weeks, then felt great at practice. “My game had been feeling like it’s turned a corner a little bit,” he said.

He’s certainly improved his ranking after the PGA Championship, moving up to No. 40 in the world.

That showed over the many faces of The Ocean Course. Lynn opened with a 73 in what proved to be the mildest conditions of the week Thursday. He held firm Friday with a second-round 74 as wind gusts off the Atlantic Ocean approached 40 mph. Lynn broke par with a 68 in the rain-delayed third round. While Carl Pettersson and Ian Poulter had early birdies to keep pace with McIlroy early on, both faded down the stretch.

Poulter had bogeys on four of the final six holes, including the 18th, to fall to 4-under. Pettersson also came in at 4-under, his round of 72 that included a two-shot penalty on No. 1 for moving a leaf while in a hazard with his backs swing.

Poulter remembers rooming with Lynn when both were young English pros trying to make their marks. “This is a huge week for him,” Poulter said. “You’re disappointed that you didn’t win, but to finish second in a major in amazing.”

For Lynn, getting more chances at the majors, especially the Masters is the most special part. He knew a top-15 finish would bring him back to play the PGA Championship in 2013 at Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, N.Y. He was surprised when he found out that the top four on Kiawah Island would play for a green jacket at Augusta National. “That’s a nice bit of news that because it’s what I always wanted to do,” he said.

Lynn has one career victory on the European Tour at the Dutch Open in 2004. That was also the year of his best finish, 26th, on the European Tour money list. He credited that win a Wedgwood China ballmarker he had lost and got replaced with a 1891 “Queen’s Shilling” coin he got from his father to use as a replacement.

This morning, Lynn said he couldn’t find his latest Wedgwood marker and he was shaken up. “But then I thought, `Last time that happened, good things happened,'” he said. “I mean, that’s absolutely true.”

Lynn also explained why he’s been reluctant to qualify for the U.S. and British Opens, feeling that if you don’t automatically qualify you probably don’t belong in the field. “I actually am a bit stubborn sometimes,” he said.

Lynn hopes he can keep proving he belongs in majors and play the way he did at The Ocean Course. “To come and perform the way I have this week in a major is still very special and it’s a great achievement,” he said. “It’s not sunk in properly yet, to be honest.”

See more here: 

Runner-up David Lynn pulls PGA’s biggest surprise

Rory McIlroy the big winner on our social media board

McIlroy the big winner on our social media board

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 9:37 p.m.

By John Kim, PGA.com Coordinating Producer

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. — The 94th PGA Championship ended with the thrills, the drama and the excitement that we all hoped it would when the week began. Watching the world’s best players take on the world’s toughest golf course under major championship conditions meant there would be plenty of social media chatter over the past week — and most likely peaking on Sunday.

Once again, the PGA.com community — encompassing PGA.com commenters, our Facebook nation, our Twitter followers and those connecting on Instagram, Viddy and Pinterest came through — in a big way.

On a day that started very early — with some golfers having to play as many as 28 holes — the world woke up to a wall of weather conditions, traffic updates and, soon, scoreboard results. We kept track of everything you were talking about and created our own “scoreboard” of social media topics you were discussing. Here’s how the final day played out.

10. Adam Scott
So much hope early in the week for the dashing Aussie, especially following his disappointment at the Open Championship. But after a hot start through the first three rounds, Scott faded to a 1-over 73 on the final day. Fewer shots shown on television or online meant fewer mentions. He still made our social leaderboard. Barely.

9. Jason Dufner
Jason Dufner, last year’s runner-up at the PGA Championship, had a good week. Not a great week (like last year) but a good week. However, his presence and activity on Twitter kept the social world engaged and, even as his name dropped off the front page of the leaderboard, it remained on our social caddy standings.

8. Carl Pettersson
Pettersson entered the weekend tied for the lead and was still in contention entering the final round. However, an unfortunate penalty on the first hole effectively ended any run he could have made at the leader, but the buzz around that ruling kept his name high on social trends. It was enough to keep him at No. 8.

7. Bubba Watson
The Masters champion had a solid week, finishing tied for 11th place. But his social media following is strong and there will always be talk of him. Further, following his round, he proceeded to empty his bag of all balls and gloves and tossed them to fans. Twitter loved that act and gave him due deference for it. He moved up to No. 7.

6. Kiawah
Kiawah has been the catch-all term from social media as people have raved about the course, showed concern about the weather or shared traffic tie-ups. It’s safe to say that this South Carolina gem will never be considered “under the radar” ever again — not with all of social media talking about it like they have this week.

5. John Daly
I’m pretty sure Big John could walk through the crowd without ever hitting a golf shot and he’d trend. Especially as he was wearing his trademark “LoudMouth Golf” outfits. His colorful and flamboyant style always makes him a fan favorite. One photo we posted of him on our Facebook page drew more than 300 comments and 1600 likes. That’s moving the needle.

4. Ian Poulter
Poulter started his round with five straight birdies and it seemed for all the world that he’d do something ridiculous and historic to get his first major win. Alas, it was not to be, but his famed Twitter presence as well as his strong play drew him enough mentions to capture spot No. 4.

3. Tiger Woods
For the first time, Tiger Woods did not win our Social Caddy leaderboard. With high hopes as the day started, and more time on the course than any other player (as well as being featured twice in our marquee pairings on PGA.com), Tiger never could mount a charge and, thus, his name fell off the tournament leaderboard, and down on our social caddy standings.

2. PGA Champ
For a while there, it looked like our official hashtag, #PGAChamp, might actually win a day. People were talking about so many things regarding the tournament and using the hashtag made their posts/tweets official. We posted a high number of mentions and thought, fittingly, the championship would be the overall winner for the week. We gave it a good effort. But …

1. Rory McIlroy
McIlroy’s amazing eight-shot victory was not as lopsided as his win on social media today. All the world seemed to revel in his march into the record books as McIlroy almost tripled the second-place mentions. From his young age to his dating life to his dominating performance, Rory was the story all day – as he should have been. Congrats on your second win of the day, Rory McIlroy.

Source:

Rory McIlroy the big winner on our social media board

Steve Eubanks: Rory McIlroy a blend of two of golf’s greats

Rory McIlroy’s victory brought cheers, and even some tears, from the gallery.

Eubanks: McIlroy a blend of two of golf’s greats

Rory McIlroy won the PGA Championship with a Tiger-like dominance and an Arnold Palmer-style charm. That blend of traits is quickly making him a champion as popular as he is great.

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 9:07 p.m.

By Steve Eubanks, PGA.com

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. — He never looked uncomfortable. And he never looked his age.

At 23 years 3 months, Rory McIlroy became the youngest man to win the PGA Championship since Tom Creavy took the title in Rhode Island in 1931 – younger than Jack Nicklaus in 1963; younger than Tiger Woods in 1999; younger in fact, than anyone in the stroke-play era.

And he looked like an old soul doing it.

Loping down the fairways of the Ocean Course like a man on vacation Sunday, McIlroy never made a bogey and never looked concerned that he might. His flowing swing released the golf club without a care in the world. The drives that missed did so in the right spots, and when he missed a green, he mesmerized the crowds with a short game that would have made Seve Ballesteros smile.

This wasn’t a squeaker or a fluke. Not only did he reach 13 under, a score no one could have fathomed earlier in the week, his two major victories have been by a combined total of 16 shots.

His eight-shot margin was a PGA Championship record, and he became the second youngest man in history to win two majors (Jack Nicklaus nipped him by one month). He also regained the top spot in the Official World Golf Ranking and jumped into the Player of the Year mix.

The crowds at Kiawah embraced him, chanting “Rory, Rory” as he walked up to the final green. And there were tears — genuine, heartfelt emotional tears pouring from the eyes of total strangers — not because of the way he played, but because of who he is and what he represents.

“He’s going to be the player that kids look up to, that kids measure their own wannabe games by,” fellow Northern Irishman Graeme McDowell said. “Ten years ago it was Tiger Woods. It’s still Tiger Woods to a certain extent, but now we’ve got superstars like Rory McIlroy for kids to be looking at … with a great attitude and great charisma and great character. That’s pretty much it in a nutshell: he’s great for the game, an absolute breath of fresh air for the game of golf.”

There is nothing arrogant or pretentious about Rory, nothing that leaves the average fan saying, “He’ll learn,” or “Let him grow up.” There is no cold stare; no muscled entourage, no head-down marches past the children shouting his name. The fist pumps are just as exciting while being markedly different: more joyful and genuine without a hint of anger.

“I realize that everytime my face is on TV or I’m playing in a tournament, that I am a role model for a lot of people and a lot of kids do look up to me,” Rory said. “I try to do my best in that regard and put myself across as honestly and as modestly as possible. Some can view it as a big responsibility, but I think if you just go about your life and live it normally and live it the way you always would, I think everything’s okay. But it’s a huge honor to be put in that position. To have an effect on so many people’s lives is a nice feeling.”

Fans at the PGA Championship loved him because he won with a Tiger-kind of dominance and an Arnold Palmer-sort of charm: winking and waving after hitting one amazing shot after another.

“I got here Monday afternoon,” he said. “My locker was right by the window overlooking the putting green and overlooking like the beach and the ocean. I was thinking to myself, ‘I just have a good feeling about this week.’ I said it to (caddy) J.P (Fitzgerald) and I said it to my dad and I said it to my whole team; something about this just feels right. It’s funny how things work out.”

According to Padraig Harrington, who has known the McIlroys since Rory was a child: “Rory’s proving that when he plays well, he plays like Tiger played well. Tiger turned up for a few years where if he brought his A-Game, the rest of us struggled to compete. Rory is showing up with his A-Game and everybody is going to struggle.”

There will be the inevitable statistical comparisons. McIlroy’s second major victory came in his 17th major start. Tiger’s came in his 18th. He was three months younger than Tiger was when he won his second major. And he is already ahead on the margin of victory front.

“I’ve won my second major at the same age as he had,” McIlroy said. “But he went on that incredible run like 2000, 2001, 2002 and won so many. You know, I’d love to sit up here and tell you that I’m going to do the same thing, but I just don’t know. It’s been great to win my first major last year and to back that up with another one this year; I can’t ask for any more. I just want to keep working hard, keep practicing, and hopefully there are a few more of these in my closet when my career finishes.”

Honest and modest: The game needs someone like Rory McIlroy, not because it needs a dominant player to supplant Tiger, but because it needs a charming gentleman to recover from him.

As long as he keeps living up to his potential, golf may well have found its next great icon.

See the original post – 

Steve Eubanks: Rory McIlroy a blend of two of golf’s greats

Tiger Woods, with ‘wrong attitude,’ ends up 11 behind

Tiger Woods was tied for the lead after two rounds but is still looking for his first major since 2008.

Woods, with ‘wrong attitude,’ ends up 11 behind

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 8:26 p.m.

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — It was another weekend wipeout for Tiger Woods at a major championship.

Woods shot an even-par 72 on Sunday — after finishing a third-round 74 earlier in the day — and ended up 11 strokes behind winner Rory McIlroy at the PGA Championship.

It was a disappointing slide for Woods, who was tied for the lead after two rounds but is still looking for his first major title since 2008.

“The thing is, to keep putting myself there,” he said. “I’m not going to win them all and I haven’t won them all, so I certainly have lost a lot more than I’ve won.”

At Kiawah Island, his chance slipped away Saturday, when he bogeyed three of seven holes to start the third round before play was halted by rain.

“I came out with probably the wrong attitude (Saturday), and I was too relaxed, and tried to enjoy it, and that’s not how I play,” Woods said. “I play full systems go, all out, intense, and that’s how I won 14 of these things.”

His 15th major championship will have to wait at least until next year, even though he was in the mix yet again. In the U.S. Open this year, Woods finished 75-73 to go from a tie for the lead to a tie for 21st.

At the British Open last month, his final-round 73 left him tied for third. That was his worst round of the tournament.

At the PGA Championship, Woods returned to the course Sunday morning facing a 7-foot par putt on No. 8, which he promptly missed to drop another stroke behind. He rebounded later in his third round with birdies on Nos. 11 and 13, but the damage was done.

“You know how I am. I’m intense and I’m focused on what I’m doing and nothing else matters,” Woods said. “I got back to that today and I hit some really good shots and I played the way that I know I can play.”

Woods wasn’t pleased with a drive on the par-4 15th. His club went sailing when he let go of it on the follow through, and the ball flew well to the right of the fairway, landing in a grassy, sandy area not too far from the beach.

He was able to recover, hitting a terrific shot to the green. He then came up limping for a few seconds before pulling what appeared to be some sort of prickly brush off the right leg of his pants.

Woods looked fine when he arrived at the green and two-putted for par.

“It got in both legs — well, left shoe, right shoe, and then in my right leg,” he said. “It itched like hell for about a hole, and it was fine.”

He finished the third round five strokes behind and was never a factor after that. McIlroy’s final-round 66 had everyone else pretty much playing for second place, and Woods tied for 11th.

In the final round, Woods fell to his knees after barely missing a 20-foot eagle putt on the par-5 second hole. A tap-in birdie there and another birdie at No. 7 weren’t nearly enough.

“I putted really well today — had the speed good,” he said. “Unfortunately, I just didn’t give myself enough good looks.”

Woods went on to bogey both par 5s on the back nine while McIlroy pulled away to win by a tournament-record eight strokes.

“The key is putting myself there each and every time, and you know, I’ll start getting them again,” Woods said. “We’ve got a lot of golf to be played the rest of the year, some big events coming up and the Ryder Cup at the end of it — so looking forward to that.”

Continued: 

Tiger Woods, with ‘wrong attitude,’ ends up 11 behind

2012 PGA Championship Final Results and Money

2012 PGA Championship Final Results and Money

2012 PGA Championship Final Results and Money

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 7:59 p.m.

1

MCILROY, Rory

67

75

67

66

275

$1,445,000.00

2

LYNN, David

73

74

68

68

283

$865,000.00

T3

ROSE, Justin

69

79

70

66

284

$384,500.00

T3

BRADLEY, Keegan

68

77

71

68

284

$384,500.00

T3

POULTER, Ian

70

71

74

69

284

$384,500.00

T3

PETTERSSON, Carl

66

74

72

72

284

$384,500.00

T7

ADAMS, Blake

71

72

75

67

285

$226,000.00

T7

DONALDSON, Jamie

69

73

73

70

285

$226,000.00

T7

HANSON, Peter

69

75

70

71

285

$226,000.00

T7

STRICKER, Steve

74

73

67

71

285

$226,000.00

T11

CURTIS, Ben

69

77

73

67

286

$143,285.71

T11

WATSON, Bubba

73

75

70

68

286

$143,285.71

T11

CLARK, Tim

71

73

73

69

286

$143,285.71

T11

OGILVY, Geoff

68

78

70

70

286

$143,285.71

T11

MCDOWELL, Graeme

68

76

71

71

286

$143,285.71

T11

WOODS, Tiger

69

71

74

72

286

$143,285.71

T11

SCOTT, Adam

68

75

70

73

286

$143,285.71

T18

DALY, John

68

77

73

69

287

$99,666.66

T18

HARRINGTON, Padraig

70

76

69

72

287

$99,666.66

T18

VAN PELT

73

73

67

74

287

$99,666.66

T21

OOSTHUIZEN, Louis

70

79

70

69

288

$72,666.66

T21

LUITEN, Joost

68

76

75

69

288

$72,666.66

T21

GARRIGUS, Robert

74

73

74

67

288

$72,666.66

T21

PEREZ, Pat

69

76

71

72

288

$72,666.66

T21

NOH, Seung-Yul

74

75

74

65

288

$72,666.66

T21

WALKER, Jimmy

73

75

67

73

288

$72,666.66

T27

OLESEN, Thorbjorn

75

74

71

69

289

$51,900.00

T27

JIMENEZ, Miguel Angel

69

77

72

71

289

$51,900.00

T27

DUFNER, Jason

74

76

68

71

289

$51,900.00

T27

LEISHMAN, Marc

74

72

71

72

289

$51,900.00

T27

IMMELMAN, Trevor

71

72

70

76

289

$51,900.00

T32

SENDEN, John

73

74

72

71

290

$42,625.00

T32

CHALMERS, Greg

70

76

72

72

290

$42,625.00

T32

HAAS, Bill

75

73

69

73

290

$42,625.00

T32

DONALD, Luke

74

76

74

66

290

$42,625.00

T36

JACOBSON, Fredrik

71

75

73

72

291

$34,750.00

T36

BEEM, Rich

72

76

72

71

291

$34,750.00

T36

YANG, Y.E.

73

74

74

70

291

$34,750.00

T36

MICKELSON, Phil

73

71

73

74

291

$34,750.00

T36

SIEM, Marcel

72

73

71

75

291

$34,750.00

T36

SINGH, Vijay

71

69

74

77

291

$34,750.00

T42

HENRY, J.J.

72

77

70

73

292

$25,750.00

T42

FURYK, Jim

72

77

70

73

292

$25,750.00

T42

BADDELEY, Aaron

68

75

74

75

292

$25,750.00

T42

WOODLAND, Gary

67

79

75

71

292

$25,750.00

T42

TOMS, David

72

78

72

70

292

$25,750.00

T42

LAIRD, Martin

71

74

79

68

292

$25,750.00

T48

LAWRIE, Paul

73

75

71

74

293

$18,625.00

T48

ELS, Ernie

72

75

73

73

293

$18,625.00

T48

JOHNSON, Dustin

71

79

72

71

293

$18,625.00

T48

BJORN, Thomas

70

79

74

70

293

$18,625.00

T48

GOOSEN, Retief

73

75

75

70

293

$18,625.00

T48

PIERCY, Scott

68

78

78

69

293

$18,625.00

T54

MOLINARI, Francesco

70

75

74

75

294

$16,810.00

T54

BAE, Sang Moon

72

78

71

73

294

$16,810.00

T54

CLARKE, Darren

73

76

72

73

294

$16,810.00

T54

DE JONGE, Brendon

71

78

72

73

294

$16,810.00

T54

CHOI, K.J.

69

77

75

73

294

$16,810.00

T59

SCHWARTZEL, Charl

70

77

74

74

295

$16,100.00

T59

ISHIKAWA, Ryo

69

77

79

70

295

$16,100.00

61

KIM, K.T.

69

77

77

73

296

$15,900.00

T62

FERNANDEZ-CASTANO, Gonzalo

67

78

75

77

297

$15,650.00

T62

REAVIE, Chez

74

76

73

74

297

$15,650.00

T62

DUKE, Ken

71

78

74

74

297

$15,650.00

T62

MCNEILL, George

71

76

80

70

297

$15,650.00

T66

NOREN, Alex

67

80

73

78

298

$15,350.00

T66

FRASER, Marcus

74

75

78

71

298

$15,350.00

T68

TANIGUCHI, Toru

72

76

78

73

299

$15,150.00

T68

HUH, John

72

78

79

70

299

$15,150.00

70

JOHNSON, Zach

72

73

76

79

300

$15,000.00

71

EVERY, Matt

72

76

74

82

304

$14,900.00

72

TRINGALE, Cameron

69

78

77

82

306

$14,800.00

Link to article: 

2012 PGA Championship Final Results and Money

Rory McIlroy wins PGA Championship by eight shots

Rory McIlroy broke the PGA Championship record for margin of victory that Jack Nicklaus set in 1980.

McIlroy wins PGA Championship by eight shots

On an extra-long Sunday at Kiawah Island, Rory McIlroy racked up an extra-big victory. McIlroy, at age 23, dominated the final round and won his second major by a PGA-record eight shots.

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 7:17 p.m.

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — Right down to his red shirt, Rory McIlroy looked every bit the part of golf’s next star in another command performance at the PGA Championship.

McIlroy validated his record-setting U.S. Open win last year by blowing away the field Sunday at Kiawah Island. One last birdie from 25 feet on the 18th hole gave him a 6-under 66 for an eight-shot victory, breaking the PGA Championship record for margin of victory that Jack Nicklaus set in 1980.

The 23-year-old from Northern Ireland returned to No. 1 in the world, and he became the youngest player since Seve Ballesteros to win two majors. Tiger Woods was about four months older than McIlroy when he won his second major.

Just like the U.S. Open, this one was never seriously in doubt.

McIlroy seized control with back-to-back birdies Sunday morning to complete the storm-delayed third round with a 67 and build a three-shot lead. No one got closer than two shots the rest of the way, and McIlroy closed out a remarkable week by playing bogey-free over the final 23 holes of a demanding Ocean Course.

David Lynn, a 38-year-old from England who was playing in America for the first time, won the B-flight. He closed with a 68 and was the runner-up.

Woods, who shared the 36-hole lead for the second time this year in a major, was never a serious factor. He tossed away his chances Saturday before the storm blew in and never could get closer than four shots. He closed with a 72, failing to break par on the weekend in any of the four majors for the first time in his career.

If there was a signature shot for McIlroy at Kiawah Island, it might have been Saturday when his tee shot lodged into a tree on the third hole. He only found it with help from the TV crew, took his penalty shot and fired a wedge into 6 feet to save par. He was on his way, and he never let up.

McIlroy also won the U.S. Open by eight shots, the kind of dominance that Woods has displayed over so many years.

By winning the PGA Championship, he is halfway home to the career Grand Slam.

“It was a great round of golf. I’m speechless,” said McIlroy after hoisting the Wanamaker Trophy, the heaviest of the four majors. “It’s just been incredible. I had a good feeling about it at the start. I never imagined to do this.”

Winning the final major the year ends what had been a tumultuous season for McIlroy. Despite winning the Honda Classic in early March, he went into a tail spin by missing four cuts over five tournaments, as questions swirled that his romance with tennis star Caroline Wozniacki was hurting his game.

Instead, McIlroy put a big hurt on the strongest field of the year.

“He’s very good. We all know the talent he has,” Woods said. “He went through a little spell this year, and I think that was good for him. We all go through those spells in our careers. He’s got all the talent in the world to do what he’s doing. And this is the way that Rory can play. When he gets it going, it’s pretty impressive to watch.”

McIlroy finished on 13-under 275.

Ian Poulter put up the stiffest challenge, though not for long. Poulter, who started the final round six shots behind, made six birdies through seven holes to get within two shots. He made three straight bogeys on the back nine and had to settle for a 69. He tied for third at 4-under 284, along with Justin Rose (66) and defending champion Keegan Bradley (68).

In the final qualifying event for the U.S. Ryder Cup team, nothing changed.

Phil Mickelson was holding down the eighth and final spot, and he stayed there when neither Bo Van Pelt nor Steve Stricker could make a move on the back nine. Davis Love III will announce four captain’s picks in three weeks.

McIlroy was tied for the lead with Vijay Singh when he returned Sunday. Twenty-seven holes later, he had no peer in the final major of the year.

When he won the U.S. Open last year, Padraig Harrington suggested that perhaps McIlroy — not Woods — might be the one to challenge the record 18 majors won by Jack Nicklaus. That looked like nothing more than one Irishman boosting another when McIlroy didn’t come close in the next five majors.

But now?

“I think winning his second major is going to make things a lot easier for him,” Harrington said. “I think last year he proved it, but there’s been ups and downs since his last major win because of the pressure and the expectations and the hype. Now he’s delivered again. It’s going to be a lot easier for him going forward. And he’ll get better.”

McIlroy went out in 33, saving par with a 10-foot putt on the ninth hole. That’s what Woods used to do in the majors.

Poulter’s birdie on the par-5 11th hole closed the gap to two shots, but not for long. From the sandy area short of the 10th green, McIlroy blasted out and closed his eyes when the wind blew sand into his face. He never saw the ball check a foot from the cup. And with a 10-foot birdie on the 12th, there was no stopping him.

The win ends a streak of the last 16 majors going to 16 different winners. McIlroy joined Woods, Harrington and Mickelson as the only players to win majors in consecutive years over the last two decades.

“It means an awful lot to look at the names on that trophy, and to put my name alongside them is very special,” McIlroy said.

Pettersson tried to put up a good fight, though he suffered a setback on the first hole without even realizing it.

The Swede drove just inside a red hazard line. He checked to make sure his club could touch the grass without grounding the club. That part was fine. However, PGA rules officials determined after scrutinizing a video replay that a small leaf that moved as Pettersson took back the club. That violates Rule 13-4c — moving a loose impediment while in a hazard — and three holes later he was informed it was a two-shot penalty. The par became a double bogey.

Pettersson responded with back-to-back birdies. By then, it was too late for Pettersson, really too late for anybody.

McIlroy might have won this major before breakfast.

He was among 26 players who had to return Sunday morning, playing the back nine to finish the storm-delayed third round. Tied with Vijay Singh at 6-under par, McIlroy missed two short birdie chances, and then made bogey on the 13th. He rebounded with birdies on the 15th and 16th, a tough bunker save on the 17th and a closing par for a 67 that gave him a three-shot lead.

Not once during the final round did the kid look like he was going to lose this one.

After going back to his island home for breakfast, a quick nap and a change of clothes — a bright red shirt, no less — McIlroy looked solid as ever. After pulling his approach on the par-5 second hole under a tree, he hit wedge off the wood chips to 6 feet for birdie. He came up just short of the green at No. 3, where the tees were moved up to play 293 yards, and hit an even better flip wedge to a tiny target on an elevated green. McIlroy holed a 15-foot birdie putt, and he was on his way.

Woods stepped into a cactus while hitting out of the dunes on the 15th hole in the morning, and his day got even more painful from there. He has gone 14 majors since winning his last one, No. 14, at the 2008 U.S. Open. He looks to be closer, with three PGA Tour wins this year and two 36-hole leads in the majors.

His regret when it was over — he tied for 11th — was all about attitude.

“I came out with the probably the wrong attitude yesterday,” he said. “And I was too relaxed, and tried to enjoy it, and that’s now how I play. I play intense and full systems go. That cost me.”

It might not have mattered.

McIlroy said earlier in the week that he only wanted to give himself a chance, to feel that buzz of being in contention in the final round. He wound up putting the buzz back into golf, a sport in which all the talk has been about parity. McIlroy’s name on the leaderboard means something.

“Rory is showing that his `A’ game, everybody else is going to struggle to compete with him,” Harrington said. “And Tiger needs his `A’ game to come up against Rory. … If Rory is playing as well as he is, Tiger is not going to pick a major off unless he’s got his `A’ game out there.”

Original post: 

Rory McIlroy wins PGA Championship by eight shots

Notebook: Luke Donald looking to majors in 2013

Luke Donald had been No. 1 in the world since late May, when he took the top spot from Rory McIlroy.

Notebook: Donald looking toward majors in 2013

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 6:06 p.m.

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — Luke Donald left The Ocean Course without a major and without the No. 1 ranking.

Donald had been No. 1 in the world since late May when he took the top spot from Rory McIlroy. The 23-year-old McIlroy regained the No. 1 position Sunday with an eight-stroke victory in the PGA Championship.

This was supposed to be the season the 34-year-old Donald shed the mantle of best player without a major. Instead, Donald was left shaking his head and knowing he won’t get his next chance until the Masters at Augusta National in eight months.

“I’ve won twice this year but I look at this year as somewhat of a disappointment in terms of the majors,” Donald said.

Donald never truly contended early on as he tied for 32nd at the Masters back in April, then missed the cut in the U.S. Open. He rallied at the British Open to finish fifth and had hoped he could be in the mix at The Ocean Course. Instead, Donald took himself out of contention with rounds of 74, 76 and 74. He recovered Sunday to shoot 66, but far too late to catch McIlroy. Donald finished at 2 over — 15 shots behind the winner.

“You always gear your season up to peak at these events and I haven’t quite figured that out yet,” he said.

PETTERSSON’S PROBLEM: Carl Pettersson kept himself at or near the top all week long at the PGA Championship. If only he’d had a leaf blower in his golf bag.

Pettersson’s chance for his first major championship ended early when he grazed a leaf with his backswing while hitting out of a lateral water hazard on the first hole of the final round. Pettersson was given a two-stroke penalty that turned his opening par into a double-bogey 6 that he couldn’t recover from.

The Rules of Golf state you can’t move a loose impediment lying in the hazard.

“I’ve got to take it on the chin, obviously, but it’s one of those stupid rules,” he said.

Pettersson was quickly told he might have broken the rule, but officials wanted to check the videotape. Rules Chairman David Price confirmed the violation and told Pettersson he had incurred the penalty. Price came to the scorer’s trailer after Pettersson’s round and told the player officials were sure the ruling was correct. Pettersson said he would accept the decision. “They wouldn’t lie,” he said. “I mean, they said they looked at it a million times.”

Pettersson tried not to let the penalty affect his game and made three straight birdies on the front to keep pace with McIlroy, one of his playing partners. But Pettersson eventually ran out of gas and finished with a 72 for a 4-under 284, tied for third with last year’s PGA Champion Keegan Bradley, Ian Poulter and Justin Rose. The group was nine shots behind champion Rory McIlroy, but Pettersson would’ve finished alone in second without the penalty.

Pettersson said he won’t worry about what the mistake cost him. “I’ve got to look at the positives,” he said. “I had a great week. I had a chance to win. Just didn’t do it. And we’ll give it a shot next year.”

MORE PENALTIES: Carl Pettersson wasn’t the only player who ran afoul of the rules at the PGA Championship.

Former Masters champion Zach Johnson was assessed a one-stroke penalty on the 18th hole — his ninth hole of the final round — when his ball moved after he addressed it. Johnson told officials, who looked at the video and couldn’t find conclusive evidence the ball had moved.

Still, Johnson was convinced and took the penalty. He was credited with a triple-bogey 7 on the 18th hole and a 79 for the round.

Joost Luiten, a 26-year-old European Tour pro playing his first PGA Championship, was also docked a stroke when he struck a short putt twice with his putter on the 16th hole as he finished his third round Sunday morning.

On Luiten’s follow through, the heel of his putter brushed the ground and the club touched the moving ball a second time. Rules state a player must count the second hit as a stroke. Luiten told scoring officials and reviewed the putt on videotape, which confirmed the double hit. Luiten’s penalty gave him a 75 and dropped him to 3 over par.

DALY DOUBLE: John Daly’s proudest moment at the PGA Championship this week?

“I only made one double ( bogey),” he said, laughing.

Daly, the 1991 PGA champion, was a first-round surprise with a 68 that was just two strokes off the lead. And Big John hung in throughout the week on the difficult Ocean Course, finishing with a 69 on Sunday to end the tournament at 1 under par.

It was the first time Daly had two rounds in the 60s for this championship since he was the surprise winner at Crooked Stick 21 years ago. Daly only had four rounds in the 60s in the 19 PGA Championships he’d been in since his victory.

Daly said he maintained his composure throughout the week. “I’ve got confidence in my ball-striking ability and to keep plugging along,” he said. “When you’re not playing great, you kind of get down and go for broke. I stayed patient.”

DIVOTS: Adam Scott was asked after the third round if he could rally despite being five shots off the lead: “Well, we’ve all seen that being four down is no big deal.” Scott was four shots ahead of Ernie Els with four holes left at last month’s British Open before making four straight bogeys to finish behind Els. … Ian Poulter’s round included eight birdies, five bogeys and just five pars. He finished tied for third at 4 under. … Seung Yul Noh of South Korea had the low round of the tournament with a 65. His round included nine 3s.

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Notebook: Luke Donald looking to majors in 2013

Steve Eubanks: Mental strength will decide winner

Rory McIlroy has experienced both the highs and lows of major championship Sundays.

Eubanks: Mental strength will decide winner

Starting and stopping? No big deal. Playing 27 holes in a day? Not unusual. It’s the mental strain of this extra-long Sunday, says Steve Eubanks, that will determine the winner.

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 12:02 p.m.

By Steve Eubanks, PGA.com

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. – Physically, it’s not that tough.

Professional golfers are accustomed to starting and stopping, especially on the East Coast in the summer when thunderstorms can blossom at any place and time.

Hoofing it for 27 holes on a Sunday is not that unusual or demanding.

But the mental strain of a championship is always taxing. And when you stretch the final day of a major to 12-plus hours, mental toughness will be pushed to a level some of these players have never seen.

The edge this afternoon goes to those who have won on the game’s biggest stages, but who have also lost the big ones down the stretch. Only by knowing both feelings can you stay strong when the anxiety, pressure and fatigue mount.

“You’ve got to be tough,” the leader Rory McIlroy said after finishing his morning round. “I think you see a lot of guys who haven’t held on in the past, it’s been a first-time experience for them. You know, I learned a lot from the Masters last year, and that’s definitely something that I can think back to and draw on some of those memories, and some of the feelings I had at Congressional as well.”

Trevor Immelman knows what it feels like to be at the top and at the bottom. After his 2008 Masters win, Immelman suffered a wrist injury that almost ruined his career. His best finish in a major since that time was a tie for 10th in last year’s PGA Championship.

Sunday morning on the range, Claude Harmon said to Immelman, “Remember this feeling. Look around you. Everybody you would expect to be on the range in the last day of a major is here. And so are you.”

Immelman played as confidently and aggressively as he has in years, shooting 2 under to crawl into a tie for third.

“There were times I wondered if would be able to get back and play the way I wanted to play,” he said. “Now, I have nothing to lose. I’ve won one of these before so I know what it feels like, I know what it takes, and hopefully things will go my way this afternoon and we’ll see what happens. I have a chance and all you want is to have a shot.”

Adam Scott is still looking for his first major, but no one knows better how mentally tough the final round can be. He even joked about it after the morning session, saying, “We’ve all seen that four (shots) back is not a big deal.”

“In the last round of a major, in contention, obviously to have a good round and try to win requires mental toughness,” Scott said. “I think this afternoon as it comes down to the back nine, especially at this golf course, it’s going to require everyone’s skill to be at their best.”

“You have to be mentally tough at any golf tournament let alone a major,” Immelman said. “You certainly have to have your wits about you. The game is so fickle, and this is an interesting style of golf course where you can’t get ahead of yourself.”

The mind can turn the game so easily. One good swing, one long-lost memory from the recesses of good rounds past, and things can turn around in an instant. On the other hand, one familiar flaw – a pull into a bunker or a putt that spins weakly off the face – and the demons of rounds lost can creep into the crevices of a weak psyche.

“I came here this week with some fresh ideas and my confidence started growing,” Immelman said. “I started hitting shots I was familiar with. More importantly I was familiar with the misses I was hitting and why they were happening. My short game has been real good. I know it’s in there somewhere. I know what it takes. I’ve proven that to myself. If you get a bit of confidence going, you never know what can happen.”

Indeed, for the strong of mind and spirit, you never know.

Originally posted here:

Steve Eubanks: Mental strength will decide winner

McIlroy roars into PGA lead heading to final round

Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy made seven birdies and two bogeys during his two-day third-round at The Ocean Course.

McIlroy roars into lead heading to final round

Rory McIlroy returned to The Ocean Course Sunday morning and completed a 5-under 67 to grab a three-shot lead over Carl Pettersson heading to the final round of the 94th PGA Championship.

Published: Sunday, August 12, 2012 | 10:08 a.m.

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — In a year when no lead seems safe, Rory McIlroy is the man trying to hold on in the season’s last major.

McIlroy began the final round with an easy par Sunday to remain the leader at 7 under in the PGA Championship, but Ian Poulter started with four straight birdies to pull into sole possession of second place, two shots behind.

Watch Rory McIlroy HighlightsAll Video HighlightsAll Video FeaturesPhoto Galleries

Carl Pettersson was third at 4 under.

McIlroy finished his third round earlier Sunday, wrapping up a 5-under 67 after players returned to Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course. The third round was halted by rain late Saturday afternoon.

Tiger Woods made a birdie on No. 2 to join a group of players at 3 under that also included Adam Scott.

McIlroy, the 2011 U.S. Open champion, hasn’t finished higher than 40th in a major this year, but he became the first player this weekend to open any significant distance on the field when he birdied the 15th and 16th holes toward the end of his third round. That was after he made five birdies on the front nine Saturday.

“I thought it was just a continuation of how I played yesterday afternoon,” McIlroy said. “I struck the ball beautifully from tee to green — same thing on Thursday, as well. Just one more round like that, and I’ll be happy.”

Poulter began applying pressure immediately, and his putt from about 20 feet for a birdie on No. 4 moved him to 5 under.

Jimmy Walker, Peter Hanson and Bo Van Pelt were with Woods and Scott at 3 under.

Woods trailed by five after a third-round 74, but he reached the par-5 second hole in two and then dropped to his knees after nearly making an eagle putt from about 20 feet. He settled for a tap-in birdie instead.

It was Scott who was in control at the British Open last month before bogeying the last four holes and losing to Ernie Els. None of the 54-hole leaders at the other three majors this year — Scott at the British Open, Peter Hanson at the Masters, and Graeme McDowell and Jim Furyk at the U.S. Open — have held on to win.

“Obviously to have a good round and try and win requires mental toughness,” Scott said. “I think this afternoon as it comes down to the back nine, especially at this golf course, is going to require everyone’s skill to be at their best.”

Woods will have a lot to do in the final round if he hopes to win his 15th major championship and first since 2008.

“I’m right there,” Woods said after finishing his third round. “I was at one point six back, and we had a lot of holes to play, so I was very encouraged the way I dug down deep and got this thing turned around and gave myself a chance going into this afternoon.”

In the morning, while playing the third round, Woods wasn’t pleased with his drive on the par-4 15th hole. His club went sailing when he let go of it on the follow through, and the ball flew well to the right of the fairway, landing in a grassy, sandy area not too far from the beach.

He was able to recover, hitting a terrific shot to the green. He then came up limping for a few seconds before pulling what appeared to be some sort of prickly brush off the right leg of his pants.

Woods looked fine when he arrived at the green and two-putted for par.

“It got in both legs — well, left shoe, right shoe, and then in my right leg,” he said. “It itched like hell for about a hole, and it was fine.”

With a number of players finishing the third round Sunday morning, the final round was being played in threesomes off both tees, rare for a major championship.

It was the first time since 2008 that the PGA Championship didn’t complete three rounds on Saturday. Some players had to go 36 holes on the final day that year, and Padraig Harrington wound up winning his second straight major.

©2012 by STATS LLC and Associated Press.

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McIlroy roars into PGA lead heading to final round

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