_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"caddywise.com","urls":{"Home":"http://caddywise.com","Category":"http://caddywise.com/category/uncategorized/","Archive":"http://caddywise.com/2018/02/","Post":"http://caddywise.com/trump-visits-shooting-victims-local-police-en-route-to-mar-a-lago-for-long-weekend/","Page":"http://caddywise.com/golf-caddy-scholarships/","Nav_menu_item":"http://caddywise.com/443/"}}_ap_ufee

Entries Tagged as ''

Tour drops its doping case against Vijay Singh

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The PGA Tour dropped its doping case against Vijay Singh on Tuesday based on new information from the World Anti-Doping Agency, which said using deer antler spray is no longer prohibited because it contains such small amounts of a growth hormone factor.

“The bottom line is that given the change by WADA, we are dropping the case against Mr. Singh,” PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem said Tuesday.

Finchem said Singh’s appeal of the sanctions was almost over when WADA, which had warned about the spray in February, told the tour Friday it no longer considers the use of deer antler spray to be prohibited except for a positive test result.

WADA sent the tour a written statement Tuesday, indicating that the spray is known to contain small amounts of IGF-1.

“Based on this new information, and given WADA’s lead role in interpreting the prohibited list, the tour deemed it only fair to no longer treat Mr. Singh’s use of deer antler spray as a violation of the tour’s anti-doping program,” Finchem said, reading from a statement.

The decision ends a three-month saga that had players wondering what would happen to Singh, a 50-year-old Fijian with three major championships who is famous for the endless hours he spends on the practice range.

Singh said in an interview with Sports Illustrated that he paid $9,000 last November for deer antler spray, hologram chips and other products from Sports With Alternatives To Steroids. The spray was said to contain IGF-1, an insulin-like growth hormone that is on the list of banned substances under the tour’s anti-doping policy.

The tour said Singh provided a sample of the spray, and tests at a UCLA laboratory confirmed the presence of IGF-1.

Even though Singh never tested positive for the banned substance, the tour’s policy says that admitting to use of such a substance is a violation, positive test or not. The tour penalized Singh on Feb. 19 — Tuesday of the Match Play Championship, for which Singh was not eligible — and Singh appealed a week later.

Deer antler spray was also in the news before the Super Bowl, with a report connecting Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis to the product.

The tour contacted WADA to confirm technical points when the agency clarified its position. WADA provided a written statement to the tour Tuesday.

“We’re talking about a determination that was made by scientists at WADA that relate to the consumption, through deer antler spray, of a technically violative substance, IGF-1,” Finchem said. “But in looking at it, the scientists concluded it resulted in infinitesimal amounts actually being taken into the recipient’s body, amounts that couldn’t be distinguished even if you had an accurate test with the amount that you might take into your body from milk, etc.”

He said a player taking enough IGF-1 to register a positive result is not possible “because a positive reading means that you’re surpassing a certain level. There hasn’t been any level ever set.”

“The fact of the matter here is — as some people in the medical community pointed out when this matter came up, and now science at WADA has looked into it and concluded on their own — it’s just not worth having it on the list in that context,” Finchem said. “I don’t know of a substance or a transfer mechanism out there that can loan a person to IGF levels that would get the attention of the WADA science people. Clearly, this isn’t one. They’ve made that clear to us.”

Finchem said he informed Singh of the decision Tuesday afternoon at Quail Hollow, where Singh is playing in the Wells Fargo Championship. Singh has dropped out of the top 100 in the world and has not won on the PGA Tour since the Deutsche Bank Championship in 2008, just months after the tour began drug testing.

“I don’t think you can move ahead with a prosecution on a player given this set of facts,” Finchem said. “That’s our conclusion. Vijay wasn’t assessed this action because he was negligent. He wasn’t assessed it because he made a mistake. He was assessed it because he violated the doping code, and the doping code is predicated on a list of substances. And we’re now finding from WADA that that substance doesn’t trigger a positive test to admission, so we have to respect that.”

Finchem declined to say what kind of suspension Singh had faced.

Link:  

Tour drops its doping case against Vijay Singh

Golf-Singh cleared of doping after deer antler spray admission

April 30 (Reuters) – Vijay Singh has been cleared of doping by the PGA Tour despite admitting that he used a spray containing elements of a banned substance.

Although he never failed a drugs test, Singh was deemed to have breached golf’s rules on doping when he told Sports Illustrated earlier this year he had used deer antler spray.

The spray was found to have contained small extracts of IGF-1, a growth hormone on the World Anti-Doping Agency‘s (WADA) list of prohibited substances.

The PGA Tour imposed a sanction on Singh following his admission but the Fijian appealed, saying he was unaware the spray contained any banned substances.

He was later cleared when WADA informed the PGA Tour the use of deer antler spray was not prohibited unless a positive test resulted.

“Based on this new information, and given WADA’s lead role in interpreting the Prohibited List, the Tour deemed it only fair to no longer treat Mr. Singh’s use of deer antler spray as a violation of the Tour’s anti-doping program,” the PGA said in a statement released on Tuesday.

“Since his initial quote was made public, Mr. Singh has cooperated with the Tour investigation and has been completely forthcoming and honest.

“While there was no reason to believe that Mr. Singh knowingly took a prohibited substance, the PGA Tour Anti-Doping Program clearly states that players are responsible for use of a prohibited substance regardless of intent.”

Singh, 50, was ranked number one in the world on three separate occasions between 2004 and 2005. He also won three majors: the 2000 Masters and the 1998 and 2004 PGA Championship. (Reporting by Frank Pingue in Toronto; editing by Julian Linden)

See the original post: 

Golf-Singh cleared of doping after deer antler spray admission

PGA Tour drops doping case against Vijay Singh

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The PGA Tour dropped its doping case against Vijay Singh on Tuesday based on new information from the World Anti-Doping Agency, which said using deer antler spray is no longer prohibited because it contains such small amounts of a growth hormone factor.

“The bottom line is that given the change by WADA, we are dropping the case against Mr. Singh,” PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem said Tuesday.

SINGH STATEMENT

To read the PGA Tour’s statement regarding the Vijay Singh case, click here.

Finchem said Singh’s appeal of the sanctions was almost over when WADA, which had warned about the spray in February, told the tour last Friday it no longer considers the use of deer antler spray to be prohibited except for a positive test result.

WADA sent the tour a written statement Tuesday, indicating that the spray is known to contain small amounts of IGF-1.

“Based on this new information, and given WADA’s lead role in interpreting the prohibited list, the tour deemed it only fair to no longer treat Mr. Singh’s use of deer antler spray as a violation of the tour’s anti-doping program,” Finchem said, reading from a statement.

The decision ends a three-month saga that had players wondering what would happen to Singh, a 50-year-old Fijian with three major championships who is famous for the endless hours he spends on the practice range.

Singh said in an interview with Sports Illustrated that he paid $9,000 last November for deer antler spray, hologram chips and other products from Sports With Alternatives To Steroids. The spray was said to contain IGF-1, an insulin-like growth hormone that is on the list of banned substances under the tour’s anti-doping policy.

The tour said Singh provided a sample of the spray, and tests at a UCLA laboratory confirmed the presence of IGF-1.

Even though Singh never tested positive for the banned substance, the tour’s policy says that admitting to use of such a substance is a violation, positive test or not. The tour penalized Singh on Feb. 19 — Tuesday of the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship, for which Singh was not eligible — and Singh appealed a week later.

Deer antler spray was also in the news before the Super Bowl, with a report connecting Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis to the product.

The tour contacted WADA to confirm technical points when the agency clarified its position. WADA provided a written statement to the tour Tuesday.

“We’re talking about a determination that was made by scientists at WADA that relate to the consumption, through deer antler spray, of a technically violative substance, IGF-1,” Finchem said. “But in looking at it, the scientists concluded it resulted in infinitesimal amounts actually being taken into the recipient’s body, amounts that couldn’t be distinguished even if you had an accurate test with the amount that you might take into your body from milk, etc.”

He said a player taking enough IGF-1 to register a positive result is not possible “because a positive reading means that you’re surpassing a certain level. There hasn’t been any level ever set.”

“The fact of the matter here is — as some people in the medical community pointed out when this matter came up, and now science at WADA has looked into it and concluded on their own — it’s just not worth having it on the list in that context,” Finchem said. “I don’t know of a substance or a transfer mechanism out there that can loan a person to IGF levels that would get the attention of the WADA science people. Clearly, this isn’t one. They’ve made that clear to us.”

Finchem said he informed Singh of the decision Tuesday afternoon at Quail Hollow, where Singh is playing in the Wells Fargo Championship. Singh has dropped out of the top 100 in the world and has not won on the PGA Tour since the Deutsche Bank Championship in 2008, just months after the tour began drug testing.

“I don’t think you can move ahead with a prosecution on a player given this set of facts,” Finchem said. “That’s our conclusion. Vijay wasn’t assessed this action because he was negligent. He wasn’t assessed it because he made a mistake. He was assessed it because he violated the doping code, and the doping code is predicated on a list of substances. And we’re now finding from WADA that that substance doesn’t trigger a positive test to admission, so we have to respect that.”

Finchem declined to say what kind of suspension Singh had faced.

Read More:  

PGA Tour drops doping case against Vijay Singh

Mercedes-Benz replaces ExxonMobil as one of three main Masters sponsors

AUGUSTA, Ga. — Mercedes-Benz has upgraded its corporate involvement at the Masters by becoming one of three global sponsors, allowing the Germany-based automaker to air television ads during the limited commercial space in domestic telecasts.

Augusta National Chairman Billy Payne said Tuesday that Mercedes-Benz will join AT&T and IBM as the tournament’s three main sponsors. Mercedes replaces ExxonMobil, which had been a global sponsor since 2005.

Mercedes-Benz is also an Official Patron of the PGA of America.

The Masters kept its total sponsorship at five companies – three global sponsors and two international partners. Mercedes had been a partner since 2008 until elevating its sponsorship status. Payne said UPS has signed on as the other partner, joining Rolex.

“The Masters is the most prestigious golf tournament in the world. It is a great honor for Mercedes-Benz to now be associated with the Masters Tournament as one of the three global sponsors,” said Joachim Schmidt, the company’s executive vice president of sales and marketing.

Terms of the agreements were not disclosed.

Unlike other tournaments, sponsors of the Masters do not use logos anywhere on the golf course. Some of the client entertainment takes place in permanent chalets tucked well behind the trees left of the 10th fairway.

The Masters went two years without corporate sponsors during the initial dispute in 2003 over all-male membership. The tournament was commercial-free for two years, with the club picking up the tab for the broadcast fees.

Sponsorship returned in 2005 with AT&T, IBM and ExxonMobil as the main three. The Masters only has four minutes of commercials for every hour.

Last fall, Augusta National accepted its first two female members, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore. Both were at the Masters this month in their green jackets.

“The relationships we form are important to our commitment of continuous improvement, and we sincerely appreciate the longtime assistance and enthusiasm of ExxonMobil for their support,” Payne said. “We now look forward to growing our associations with Mercedes-Benz and UPS, two globally recognized brands that also share a passion for the Masters and the tournament’s sustained success.”

ExxonMobil did not say why its sponsorship of the Masters ended.

“ExxonMobil has concluded its advertising sponsorship of the Masters tournament after nine successful years,” spokesman Alan Jeffers said in an email. “ExxonMobil continually evaluates and modifies our sponsorship and advertising requirements based on business needs.”

Mercedes-Benz has been active in sports sponsorship since the 1980s.

Adam Scott became the first Australian to win the Masters this year. He already had a sponsorship deal with Mercedes.

Read this article: 

Mercedes-Benz replaces ExxonMobil as one of three main Masters sponsors

Simpson hopes experience at Merion will help him defend U.S. Open title

ARDMORE, Pa. — Webb Simpson has already played for an amateur championship at Merion.

He’s ready to win a major there on his next visit.

Simpson is one of the few active PGA Tour members to play at the suburban Philadelphia course, competing at the 2005 U.S. Amateur. When he returns in June, Simpson has a grander goal in mind for his return visit than finishing 72 holes: Simpson wants to defend his U.S. Open championship.

”I tell people all the time it is my favorite golf course in the world,” he said Monday. ”What it demands out of the players is so different than most golf courses, and it seems like most golf courses now are evolving to be bombers paradise. Every par 4 is 500 yards, and you hit a driver on every hole. Merion’s the opposite.”

The U.S. Open is set to return in June to Merion Golf Club for the first time since 1981 — and the U.S. Open at Merion will be the shortest course for a major championship in eight years.

The U.S. Open was played at Merion in 1934, 1950, 1971 and 1981. Bobby Jones won the U.S. Amateur there in 1930, and tournaments from the Curtis Cup to the Walker Cup also have been played at the course.

With a shorter course, birdies could become more expected. USGA Executive Director Mike Davis said Merion will play at 6,996 yards on the scorecard. The last major course that was under 7,000 yards was Shinnecock Hills for the 2004 U.S. Open, which played 6,996 yard. Merion will be the shortest since Southern Hills, which was 6,973 in 2001.

”There’s going to be more birdies made at this U.S. Open than any we have seen in recent history,” said USGA Executive Director Mike Davis. ”There’s just some holes out here that lend themselves to it. Which is wonderful. Then there’s some holes that are very tough. I would contend that you’ve got this balance of some of the easiest holes for U.S. Opens that you’ll see in the modern era, yet at the same time, they have got some tough holes.”

Davis and club officials spoke on a rainy Monday at Merion that certainly didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the return of major golf to the Philadelphia area. Simpson, who Skyped in for the event, had his championship trophy by his side.

”It’s even more of an honor at a place I love,” he said. ”I can’t wait to get there.”

Simpson emerged last year on a fog-filled final day at The Olympic Club in San Francisco with four birdies around the turn and a tough chip out of a hole to the right of the 18th green that he converted into par for a 2-under 68. He outlasted former U.S. Open champions Jim Furyk and Graeme McDowell and finished at 1-over 281.

Aside from the boost in his bank account and tour ranking, Simpson has been noticed more because of the win.

”When I used to sign autographs, the kid would ask the mom who I was, and sometimes she would say, ‘I don’t know who that is,”’ he said. ”But now people know who I am more.”

The USGA decided to cut down on tickets because Merion is not a big piece of property like Bethpage Black or Pinehurst. The USGA will take a financial hit compared with other venues, but it felt it was worth it. Merion expects about 25,500 fans during the peak days of the tournament.

”We don’t look at this as a one-year financial exercise,” said USGA Vice President Tom O’Toole. ”We look over a period of years, and we’re perfectly comfortable that we could come back and have a less financially significant Open.”

Merion’s famed wicker basket flagsticks will be in place. So will an increased focus on pace of play.

”We want to make sure that the pace-of-play policy is consistent with what the challenge is here at Merion,” O’Toole said. ”We’ll be looking at it closely.”

All eyes will be on Merion, which opened in 1912, for a weekend. Ben Hogan won the second of his four Opens at Merion. Lee Trevino beat Jack Nicklaus in a playoff. History is all around the famed course. It’s time to make some more.

”When we closed up in 1981, it’s not as if the course didn’t play well, but we really thought this was the last time, at least at a national Open Championship, you would ever see Merion played on TV,” Davis said. ”It had nothing to do with the golf course in terms of how it played, in terms of a test of golf. But it had everything to do with, how do you fit a modern day U.S. Open on this 111 acres?”

Simpson and the rest of his PGA Tour competitors can’t wait to find out.

Read more: 

Simpson hopes experience at Merion will help him defend U.S. Open title

British Open at Muirfield to have fewer exemptions, lengthened layout

MUIRFIELD, Scotland – British Open organizers have reduced the number of exemptions into this year’s event at Muirfield after almost having too many players last year at Royal Lytham.

Four changes have been made to the qualifying criteria, with the most significant involving the Scottish Open and French Open leading up to the British Open and the European qualifier at Sunningdale.

“Last year at Lytham we were given something of a fright because the way the exemptions fell at one point we had 161 competitors, but because of scratching and injuries we got back down to our usual field of 156,” said R&A Chief Executive Peter Dawson. “That has caused us to look at our exemptions and cut them back this year because we wanted to maintain the number of qualifying places through international qualifying and local qualifying that we had committed to.

“In recent years, we’ve given a spot in the French Open and Scottish Open to a player finishing in the top five who wasn’t otherwise exempt. This year that has been cut back to the winner of the Scottish Open only,” he explained. “Mirroring that in the United States, the same exemption applied to the Greenbrier Classic and the John Deere Classic. That has been cut back to the winner of the John Deere Classic only.

“In Japan, we had an exemption for the top two (money) winners who were not otherwise exempt, but that has been cut back to the top two only. The last change we’ve made is to take the number of qualifiers from the European International qualifier at Sunningdale down from 10 to nine.

“It’s always impossible to estimate with accuracy how many exempt players you will end up with as it depends on how many joint exemptions a player receives, but we feel a little safer with that number,” Dawson added. “We could see it coming some weeks out and we would just have had to play with a bigger field. It would have been difficult but fortunately we got away with it.”

Any vacant places will be filled from the world ranking, and Dawson was confident the changes would not affect the strength of field at the Scottish Open, which takes place from July 11-14 at Castle Stuart in Inverness.

The following week, the 142nd Open will take place at Muirfield, with the course’s popularity among players set to be tested by an extra 158 yards and “plenty of rough.”

New tees have been added on seven of the holes, taking the overall distance from 7,034 yards when Ernie Els won in 2002 to 7,192 yards (par 71) this summer.

The biggest difference is on the ninth, where a land swap with the neighboring Renaissance Club has enabled Muirfield to move the tee back almost 50 yards, extending the par 5 to 554 yards with a new bunker added on the right of the fairway and other bunkers moved closer to the green.

“We are absolutely delighted to be back at Muirfield for the 16th time,” Dawson said. “It’s immensely popular with the players … but we will be setting the golf course up to challenge these golfers.

“The rough has been cut down over the winter but will regenerate over the coming weeks. The amount of rough is weather-dependent, but we will get plenty.”

Other new features this year will include a “wi-fi mesh” around the course, primarily available in the grandstands and tented villages, a free “Open in the Square” event in nearby Edinburgh the weekend before the championship and LED scoreboards on the seventh, 11th, 16th and 17th in addition to the famous yellow scoreboard on the 18th.

Mobile phones will be allowed again after a largely successful reintroduction last year, although Executive Director of Championships Johnnie Cole-Hamilton admitted: “It did not go completely without incident. We have learnt lessons from last year and we did not get any complaints from the players, which was important. I think it will improve year on year.”

Jim McArthur, chair of the championship committee, added: “We took a big risk but we had some belief in the spectators’ respect for the game. It (allowing phones) brings so many benefits that we think we need to continue with this unless we have any major problems.

“We will also have complete control over the content displayed on the LED scoreboards – which have video capability to show live footage – to ensure that we don’t disrupt the players. We will err on the side of caution.”

See more here:

British Open at Muirfield to have fewer exemptions, lengthened layout

Wilcox wins South Georgia Classic by four shots over three runners-up

VALDOSTA, Ga. — Will Wilcox fired a 1-over-par 73 Sunday and cruised to a four-stroke win at the South Georgia Classic, his first career title on the Web.com Tour. Wilcox began the final round at the Kinderlou Forest Golf Club with a whopping seven-stroke lead – courtesy of a course-record 63 Saturday – and never let any of his challengers get closer than the final margin all afternoon.

The 26-year-old from Alabama bogeyed the 72nd hole, but it didn’t matter as he finished at 15 under par, well in front of Monday qualifier Zack Sucher (65), D.J. Brigman (70) and Michael Putnam (70).

SOUTH GEORGIA CLASSIC

Golf on TVThursday recapFriday recapSaturday recapSunday recap

MORE FROM PGA.COM, SOUTH GEORGIA CLASSIC

What’s in the winners’ bagsVideo: Weekly Golf BuzzWeek’s worth of equipment tweetsWho’s winning driver derby?Who’s winning putter derby?Photos: Top 10 equipment shotsPhotos: Golf around the world Lesson Learned: When to lay up

Alex Rocha (67), Andrew Loupe (70) and Ryan Spears (71) tied for fifth place, five shots back.

“This is just surreal. I’ve been dreaming about this my whole life,” said Wilcox, who adopted a ‘better golf through cleaner living’ approach at the start of the year. “I’ve made some really big changes in my life and that’s obviously what I needed to do and continue with.”

Wilcox, a third-year pro, picked up a check for $117,000 and vaulted from No. 55 to No. 3 as the tour reached the one-third mark of the 2013 schedule. His season total of $139,061 puts him on track to finish among the 25 leading money winners this year that will earn a spot on the 2014 PGA Tour.

“I can’t even think that far ahead right now,” said Wilcox, trying to gain some perspective of what might be ahead.

Sunday’s finale was not without a bit of drama as Wilcox stumbled a few times, but managed to rebound quickly and dash the hopes of anyone trying to catch him.

“I barely slept. I woke up at 4:00 a.m. My heart was racing but I was so tired,” said the winner of his Saturday night. “It just wasn’t fun at all and I was ready to just get back to the golf course this morning.”

Wilcox ripped a drive at the par-5 second hole and needed only an 8-iron to reach the green in two. A two-putt birdie settled his nerves and increased his lead.

Bogeys at Nos. 3 and 6 dropped him to 15 under par and cut his lead to four strokes. Wilcox then stiff-armed the field at the par-4 seventh hole when he holed a wedge from 135 yards for an eagle-2.

“Four shots with 12 to play doesn’t sound very good but six up with 11 to go is a lot better. I don’t even know what to say,” said Wilcox, who holed a 7-iron for an eagle-2 in Saturday’s record-setting round. “I can’t believe I holed two shots on the weekend. It’s mind blowing. It’s just the damnedest thing. I haven’t got any idea what gotten into me.”

Wilcox remained comfortably in front the rest of the way.

“I relaxed when I saw nobody was making a move,” said the now laid-back champion. “The walk up 18 was sweet.”

Sucher fired the day’s best round, and by finishing in the top 25, he earned a berth in next week’s Stadion Classic in Athens, Ga.

“My immediate goal this week was just to get in the top 25 so I could play again next week,” said Sucher, who started the day 12 shots off the pace. “I had no thoughts about winning. I just wanted to get it going on the front and then see what might happen on the back.”

Sucher made four birdies and an eagle on the front and turned in 6-under 30 after playing that side in 2 over the first three days.

“I had the putter going,” he said. “I guess at that point I started thinking about maybe the top-10 but the goal was still to do well enough to play next week.”

Sucher played on tour in 2011 and made only five cuts in 11 starts. His best finish was a tie for 32nd at the Price Cutter Charity Championship and he wound up No. 174 on the money list. Sucher, 26, graduated from the University of Alabama-Birmingham in 2009 and now lives in Atlanta.

Fourth-Round Notes:

–Wilcox has made the cut in four of his six starts this year. His only other top-25 finish was a tie for 12th at the Chile Classic. He earned his first career Web.com Tour win in his 49th career start.

–Wilcox became the fourth first-time winner in seven events on Tour this year. He joined Kevin Foley (Panama), Patrick Cantlay (Colombia) and Benjamin Alvarado (Brasil) as first-time winners in 2013.

–Brazil’s Alex Rocha birdied four of his final five holes for a 67 and finished in the top five for the second time this year (tied for fourth at the Colombia Championship). Rocha moved up to No. 19 on the money list.

–Daniel Bowden, a Monday qualifier who was born in Valdosta, will be heading to the Stadion Classic thanks to his tie for eighth. Bowden, 24, graduated from Furman University in 2010, and was making only his third career start on tour.

–Sponsor exemption Adam Mitchell fired a 67 and moved up to finish tied for 15th, which also earned him a spot in the Stadion Classic in Athens, where he was a member of the Bulldog golf team and an All-America selection. Mitchell graduated in 2009 and was a member of the 2009 U.S. Walker Cup team. This was his sixth career start, dating back to 2008, when he tied for 51st as an amateur at the Chattanooga Classic. Mitchell, an Atlanta resident, had made two previous cuts.

–Leading money winner Edward Loar stumbled on the weekend with rounds of 78-76 and wound up tied for 58th. Despite the finish, Loar maintained his place at No. 1 on the money list, where he has been for four weeks.

Original link: 

Wilcox wins South Georgia Classic by four shots over three runners-up

Golf-U.S. PGA Tour New Orleans Classic scores

April 28 (Infostrada Sports) – Scores from the U.S. PGA Tour New Orleans Classic at the par-72 course on Sunday in Avondale, Louisiana

268 Billy Horschel (U.S.) 67 71 66 64

269 D.A. Points (U.S.) 66 68 70 65

271 Kyle Stanley (U.S.) 72 67 65 67

273 Bobby Gates (U.S.) 67 70 70 66

Lucas Glover (U.S.) 65 67 70 71

274 Boo Weekley (U.S.) 65 68 73 68

Harris English (U.S.) 68 70 69 67

275 Aaron Watkins (U.S.) 71 69 70 65

John Peterson (U.S.) 71 67 70 67

Nicolas Colsaerts (Belgium) 70 68 70 67

Lee Dong-Hwan (South Korea) 70 70 68 67

Luke Guthrie (U.S.) 67 71 69 68

Kevin Stadler (U.S.) 68 72 65 70

Jimmy Walker (U.S.) 67 71 66 71

276 Bubba Watson (U.S.) 73 65 72 66

Ernie Els (South Africa) 67 69 72 68

Peter Tomasulo (U.S.) 73 67 68 68

Justin Rose (Britain) 68 69 70 69

Nick Watney (U.S.) 69 69 69 69

Henrik Norlander (Sweden) 71 70 65 70

277 Brandt Jobe (U.S.) 70 70 69 68

Retief Goosen (South Africa) 71 70 68 68

Steve LeBrun (U.S.) 70 68 72 67

Morgan Hoffmann (U.S.) 66 69 73 69

Richard Lee (U.S.) 70 69 69 69

Chris Kirk (U.S.) 67 72 69 69

David Hearn (Canada) 71 69 68 69

Joey Snyder III (U.S.) 72 67 72 66

Ken Duke (U.S.) 70 69 68 70

Ken Looper (U.S.) 73 66 67 71

278 Luke List (U.S.) 71 70 68 69

279 Ryan Palmer (U.S.) 70 70 69 70

Fabian Gomez (Argentina) 71 70 68 70

Doug LaBelle II (U.S.) 70 67 73 69

Brian Davis (Britain) 68 69 73 69

Brendan Steele (U.S.) 70 71 70 68

Stephen Ames (Canada) 67 72 69 71

Matt Every (U.S.) 68 72 71 68

Rickie Fowler (U.S.) 67 73 71 68

Matt Jones (Australia) 67 71 73 68

Tommy Gainey (U.S.) 68 71 73 67

280 Jeff Overton (U.S.) 73 68 69 70

Rod Pampling (Australia) 71 70 67 72

Jason Dufner (U.S.) 70 71 67 72

Scott Brown (U.S.) 69 71 72 68

Ricky Barnes (U.S.) 64 76 66 74

281 Andrew Svoboda (U.S.) 70 70 69 72

Sean O’Hair (U.S.) 70 70 70 71

Roberto Castro (U.S.) 71 70 68 72

Derek Ernst (U.S.) 73 67 70 71

Jerry Kelly (U.S.) 70 67 71 73

George McNeill (U.S.) 74 67 70 70

Hunter Haas (U.S.) 72 69 70 70

Stuart Appleby (Australia) 70 70 71 70

Michael Letzig (U.S.) 72 68 72 69

Jason Bohn (U.S.) 68 71 73 69

David Toms (U.S.) 72 68 73 68

Graham DeLaet (Canada) 68 71 74 68

282 Chad Campbell (U.S.) 68 71 72 71

Jason Kokrak (U.S.) 68 71 73 70

Chris DiMarco (U.S.) 68 70 75 69

283 J.J. Henry (U.S.) 68 72 72 71

284 Jeff Maggert (U.S.) 70 67 73 74

285 Gary Woodland (U.S.) 68 70 73 74

286 Steven Bowditch (Australia) 73 67 71 75

Greg Chalmers (Australia) 70 71 71 74

Trevor Immelman (South Africa) 68 73 71 74

287 Lee Williams (U.S.) 70 71 73 73

288 Colt Knost (U.S.) 72 68 74 74

289 Jonas Blixt (Sweden) 71 69 74 75

292 Guan Tianlang (China) 72 69 77 74

Original link: 

Golf-U.S. PGA Tour New Orleans Classic scores

Horschel seals maiden victory in New Orleans

(Reuters) – American Billy Horschel charged ahead with six consecutive birdies, then held his nerve down the stretch to win his maiden PGA Tour title by one shot at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans in Avondale, Louisiana on Sunday.

Two strokes off the pace going into a weather-disrupted final round, Horschel took advantage of rain-softened conditions and preferred lies at the TPC Louisiana as he sealed his long-awaited breakthrough victory with an eight-under-par 64.

The slim 26-year-old, who had recorded top-10s in his three previous starts on the U.S. circuit, stunningly drained a 26-foot birdie putt at the par-five last to post a 20-under total of 268.

Horschel repeatedly pumped his right fist in delight after his ball disappeared into the cup for his ninth birdie of the day, then removed his cap to acknowledge loud cheers from the gallery packed around the 18th green.

“Oh man, it’s something I have worked so hard for and there are so many people I need to thank. And they all know who they are,” an emotional Horschel told Golf Channel after coping with two weather delays during the final round.

“And for that putt to go in … I hadn’t made a long one all week and I said, ‘I am due for a long one, I am due for a long one. Just commit to it.’

“It came off the putter so good and I am so happy it went in. This is unbelievable right now.”

Fellow American D.A. Points, playing with Horschel, had been tied for the lead with three holes remaining but settled for second place after closing with a seven-birdie 65.

Overnight leader and 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover, bidding for his fourth PGA Tour victory, fell back with an early bogey on the way to a 71 and a tie for fourth at 15 under.

Glover began the day two strokes in front and he parred the first five holes before play was suspended for about three hours as the first wave of thunderstorms rolled into the area.

At that point, his lead had shrunk to just.

THREE-WAY TIE

Soon after play resumed, Points and Horschel briefly moved into a three-way tie at the top as they each birdied the par-five seventh before Jimmy Walker sank a 26-foot eagle putt at the same hole to edge a stroke in front.

Glover slid back with a bogey at the seventh after overshooting the green and hitting a poor chip coming back.

Former Walker Cup amateur Horschel also birdied the eighth and ninth to move one ahead at 16 under before being joined by Walker, who rolled in a 10-footer to birdie the par-four eighth.

While Walker stumbled with a double-bogey at the par-three ninth, where his bump-and-run from below the green failed to crest the slope and rolled back to his feet, red-hot Horschel kept charging forward.

He sank a 14-footer to birdie the 10th and a six-footer at the par-five 11th to get to 18 under, two ahead of Points.

Both players picked up a shot at the par-four 12th, Horschel sinking a 15-footer there to tie the PGA Tour record this season of six consecutive birdies.

Horschel, speeding up in his play, bogeyed the 15th after finding the right rough off the tee and missing the green with his approach.

That dropped him into a tie with Points, who had recorded his sixth birdie of the day at the 13th.

Horschel rebounded with a birdie at the par-four 16th after hitting an exquisite approach to four feet to regain a one-stroke cushion.

Play was again suspended, for just under an hour, due to the threat of lightning shortly after Horschel drove into the left rough off the 18th tee.

On resumption, he wisely laid up in two, then struck a wedge approach to 26 feet short of the hole before sinking the birdie putt to clinch an emotional victory.

British world number four Justin Rose, the highest-ranked player in the field, closed with a 69 to tie for 15th at 12 under, level with 2012 Masters champion Bubba Watson (66) and four-times major winner Ernie Els (68).

China’s 14-year-old Guan Tianlang, after making his second consecutive cut on the PGA Tour, signed off with a two-over 74 to finish at four-over 292, stone last in the 71-strong field.

(Reporting by Mark Lamport-Stokes in Los Angeles; Editing by Gene Cherry)

Read this article: 

Horschel seals maiden victory in New Orleans

Golf-Horschel seals maiden victory in New Orleans

* Horschel sinks 26-foot birdie putt to earn win

* American closes with a nine-birdie 64

* D.A. Points finishes second after 65 (Adds detail, quotes)

April 28 (Reuters) – American Billy Horschel charged ahead with six consecutive birdies, then held his nerve down the stretch to win his maiden PGA Tour title by one shot at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans in Avondale, Louisiana on Sunday.

Two strokes off the pace going into a weather-disrupted final round, Horschel took advantage of rain-softened conditions and preferred lies at the TPC Louisiana as he sealed his long-awaited breakthrough victory with an eight-under-par 64.

The slim 26-year-old, who had recorded top-10s in his three previous starts on the U.S. circuit, stunningly drained a 26-foot birdie putt at the par-five last to post a 20-under total of 268.

Horschel repeatedly pumped his right fist in delight after his ball disappeared into the cup for his ninth birdie of the day, then removed his cap to acknowledge loud cheers from the gallery packed around the 18th green.

“Oh man, it’s something I have worked so hard for and there are so many people I need to thank. And they all know who they are,” an emotional Horschel told Golf Channel after coping with two weather delays during the final round.

“And for that putt to go in … I hadn’t made a long one all week and I said, ‘I am due for a long one, I am due for a long one. Just commit to it.’

“It came off the putter so good and I am so happy it went in. This is unbelievable right now.”

Fellow American D.A. Points, playing with Horschel, had been tied for the lead with three holes remaining but settled for second place after closing with a seven-birdie 65.

Overnight leader and 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover, bidding for his fourth PGA Tour victory, fell back with an early bogey on the way to a 71 and a tie for fourth at 15 under.

Glover began the day two strokes in front and he parred the first five holes before play was suspended for about three hours as the first wave of thunderstorms rolled into the area.

At that point, his lead had shrunk to just.

THREE-WAY TIE

Soon after play resumed, Points and Horschel briefly moved into a three-way tie at the top as they each birdied the par-five seventh before Jimmy Walker sank a 26-foot eagle putt at the same hole to edge a stroke in front.

Glover slid back with a bogey at the seventh after overshooting the green and hitting a poor chip coming back.

Former Walker Cup amateur Horschel also birdied the eighth and ninth to move one ahead at 16 under before being joined by Walker, who rolled in a 10-footer to birdie the par-four eighth.

While Walker stumbled with a double-bogey at the par-three ninth, where his bump-and-run from below the green failed to crest the slope and rolled back to his feet, red-hot Horschel kept charging forward.

He sank a 14-footer to birdie the 10th and a six-footer at the par-five 11th to get to 18 under, two ahead of Points.

Both players picked up a shot at the par-four 12th, Horschel sinking a 15-footer there to tie the PGA Tour record this season of six consecutive birdies.

Horschel, speeding up in his play, bogeyed the 15th after finding the right rough off the tee and missing the green with his approach.

That dropped him into a tie with Points, who had recorded his sixth birdie of the day at the 13th.

Horschel rebounded with a birdie at the par-four 16th after hitting an exquisite approach to four feet to regain a one-stroke cushion.

Play was again suspended, for just under an hour, due to the threat of lightning shortly after Horschel drove into the left rough off the 18th tee.

On resumption, he wisely laid up in two, then struck a wedge approach to 26 feet short of the hole before sinking the birdie putt to clinch an emotional victory.

British world number four Justin Rose, the highest-ranked player in the field, closed with a 69 to tie for 15th at 12 under, level with 2012 Masters champion Bubba Watson (66) and four-times major winner Ernie Els (68).

China’s 14-year-old Guan Tianlang, after making his second consecutive cut on the PGA Tour, signed off with a two-over 74 to finish at four-over 292, stone last in the 71-strong field. (Reporting by Mark Lamport-Stokes in Los Angeles; Editing by Gene Cherry)

View original: 

Golf-Horschel seals maiden victory in New Orleans

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor