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R&A asks members to allow women to join

The Royal & Ancient Golf Club, exclusively for men since it was founded 260 years ago at St. Andrews, will vote in September on whether women can join the club.

“It’s an exciting day for the club,” R&A Club Secretary Peter Dawson said Wednesday. “There will be quite a bit of internal discussion between now and the September vote. It’s a matter for the members to determine. All indications are very supportive.”

A statement from club said that all committees were “strongly in favor of the rule change” and asked members to go along.

The move was hailed by British sports minister Helen Grant, who was hopeful a favorable vote would encourage other single-sex golf clubs to follow suit.

Dawson, however, said the vote would have no bearing on whether the British Open is played on links courses that exclude women as members – Royal St. George’s, Royal Troon and Muirfield, where Phil Mickelson won last year. The Open returns to Troon in 2016.

“I don’t want you to think there’s any connection between this vote and these issues,” Dawson said. “What other clubs choose to do in the UK is not connected to this. … To be entirely honest, we’re not here to put pressure on other clubs that have supported The Open Championship and other R&A championships.”

The Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews has about 2,400 members from around the world and dates to 1754. The clubhouse is among the most famous buildings in golf, overlooking the Old Course at St. Andrews.

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Augusta National for years was the symbol of men-only golf clubs because it hosts The Masters every April. The club announced in August 2012 that it had invited women to join for the first time – former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore.

Even though Augusta National went 80 years without a female member, it had no policy that barred women from joining. The R&A has such a policy, and that’s what will be voted on in September.

Dawson said he did not think Augusta National’s decision had any bearing on the R&A Golf Club.

“We noted what happened at Augusta,” he said. “They have their own procedure of doing things. We are doing this because of our governance role.”

He also said the R&A did not feel pressure from any of its corporate sponsors, who were subjected to the debate at the British Open.

“You can always ask that question: `Why now? Why not 10 years ago?’ The R&A have been considering this. It’s been on our agenda, on our radar, for quite some time,” Dawson said. “The feeling is as society changes, as sport changes, as golf changes, it’s something the R&A needs to do, and is doing now as being forward-looking as we can.”

The 2,400-member club and the group that runs The Open are separate entities.

For years, the men-only Royal & Ancient was in charge of the Rules of Golf for every country in the world except for the United States and Mexico, which are governed by the USGA. And it operated the British Open, the oldest championship in golf.

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What’s Ten years ago, the administrative duties were split off into a corporate structure that is called “The R&A,” of which Dawson is the chief executive. That’s the group in charge of the Rules of Golf and organizing The Open and other R&A championships.

And while “The R&A” has female employees, its committee and board roles are populated by members of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club. So there are no women in leadership roles when it comes to rules and championship golf.

That likely will change with a favorable vote in September for female members.

“This is welcome news from the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, and I urge its members to follow their committees’ recommendations and vote `yes’ for women members,” Grant said in a statement. “It would mark a step in the right direction for the sport and I would hope encourage the remaining golf clubs that still have anachronistic single-sex member policies to follow suit.”

While the members have access to the R&A clubhouse behind the first tee at the Old Course, R&A members belong to a club, not a golf course. The seven golf courses at St. Andrews are open to the public.

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R&A asks members to allow women to join

Frustrated Woods says ‘too soon’ to make call on Masters

(Reuters) – Tiger Woods is still no closer to knowing whether he will be able to play in next month’s Masters as he struggles with back pain.

The world number one withdrew from last week’s Arnold Palmer Invitational in Florida because of his aching back and remains unsure if he will be fit for this year’s first major, starting April 10 at Augusta National.

“For Augusta, it’s actually a little too soon to be honest with you,” he told reporters on Monday at a sponsorship announcement for the AT&T National.

Woods has been plagued by back problems since last year but his condition worsened over the past month.

The 38-year-old American failed to finish the Honda Classic at Palm Beach Gardens earlier this month, quitting after 13 holes in his final round.

Then he tweaked his back again on the last day at the WGC-Cadillac Championship in Miami a week later, tumbling out of contention with a final-round 78 to finish tied for 25th.

He then pulled out of the Arnold Palmer Invitational, a tournament he has won eight times, including 2012 and 2013, in the hope that he could play at the Masters but is no closer to knowing whether he will make it to the first tee.

“That’s kind of the frustrating thing about this,” he said. “I’ve had a couple weeks off getting treatment, just working on trying to get ready for Augusta. As of right now, it’s still too soon. As I said, it’s very frustrating.”

Although Woods has missed two British Opens, one U.S. Open and one PGA Championship since 2008, he has never missed the Masters since he made his debut at Augusta National as an amateur in 1995.

He has won the tournament four times, in 1997, 2001, 2002 and 2005, but has not won any major since 2008.

(Reporting by Julian Linden in New York; Editing by Frank Pingue)

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Frustrated Woods says ‘too soon’ to make call on Masters

Tiger still unsure of Masters start in two weeks

Washington (AFP) – World number one Tiger Woods said Monday he remains uncertain if he will be able to play in the Masters despite two weeks of rest and treatment for back spasms.

Woods, a 14-time major champion chasing the all-time record 18 majors won by Jack Nicklaus, withdrew from last week’s Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill, where he has won eight times including last year, due to nagging back pain.

A year after he won five tournaments and appeared set for a solid run in the majors in 2014, his status for the Masters on April 10-13 remains in doubt even with a potential four weeks of rest for his aching back.

“For Augusta, it’s actually still a little too soon,” Woods said. “That’s the frustrating thing about this.

“I’ve had a couple of weeks off and getting treatment and working on trying to get it ready for Augusta.

“As of right now, still too soon, which is very frustrating.”

The 38-year-old American struggled to a 78 in the final round of the World Golf Championships event at Doral earlier this month, visably bothered by back pain over the final holes, and pulled out of the final round of the Honda Classic the week before.

Woods was asked about the details of his injury but did not address specifics. A Golfweek magazine report last week said Woods was suffering from a bulging disc but it would not require surgery.

Any operation might jeopardize Woods beyond the Masters in a year where the other majors are played on courses where he has won, Valhalla for the PGA Championship and Hoylake for the British Open, or finished second, with the US Open at Pinehurst, where he was the 2005 US Open runner-up.

Woods has won four times at Augusta National but has not taken a Masters green jacket since 2005. he has not won any major title since the 2008 US Open at Torrey Pines, when he limped through an 18-hole playoff to defeat Rocco Mediate.

Woods spoke in Washington just down the street from the US Capitol and White House to announce a new sponsor for his charity foundation’s US PGA Tour event at nearby Congressional Country Club.

In a putting contest with members of the military, Woods missed on three attempts, a poor omen for the undulating greens of Augusta National where precise putting is always at a premium.

Congressional Country Club members have until the end of the month to submit votes on whether or not to continue hosting the US PGA National in even-numbered years.

Woods says he is looking at other area courses that could serve as host of the event in odd-numbered years starting in 2015, with potentially more events if Congressional turns down any host role after this year.

“This event was started in DC and we would like to keep it here,” Woods said.

Woods mentioned two potential courses were at Avenel in Potomac, which hosted a prior tour event, and the Robert Trent Jones course in northern Virginia, which hosted the first three Presidents Cups.

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Tiger still unsure of Masters start in two weeks

Australian Webb rallies to claim Founders Cup golf

Phoenix (AFP) – Karrie Webb rolled in a half dozen birdies on her final eight holes as she came from behind to capture the LPGA Tour’s Founders Cup.

The 39-year-old Australian closed with a nine-under 63 to finish with a 19-under 269 and win this event for the second time in three years.

“I stood on 10 tee and thought 20-under would have a chance. I thought at 19-under I’d definitely be in a playoff, if anything, not standing here as a winner,” Webb stated.

“I wasn’t nervous, it was out of my control really. My job was done, and I just had to wait and see.”

This was Webb’s second win of the year, and 41st of her career on the LPGA Tour.

Last year’s winner Stacy Lewis earned a share of second at 18-under by shooting a six-under 66 at the Wildlife Golf Club.

Lewis tied with Amy Yang (67), Azahara Munoz (67), Mirim Lee (69) and New Zealand’s Lydia Ko (70).

Lee led after the first two rounds, while Ko was atop the leaderboard entering the final round.

Thailand’s Pornanong Phatlum (66), Jessica Korda (70) and Ryu So-Yeon (68) tied for seventh place at 17-under 271.

Webb started the day six strokes behind Ko, and she played 10 groups ahead of the leader.

Webb made a birdie on the ninth hole to make the turn at 13-under, where she was still six shots behind.

Ko, 16, faltered to bogeys on the ninth and 11th to slip into a share of the lead at 18-under. Meanwhile Webb was red hot around the turn.

After a par on 17, Webb made a 20-footer for birdie at the last to end at 19-under.

Ko was finishing the 10th hole as Webb headed to the club house, then to the range in case someone caught her and forced a playoff.

Munoz, Yang and Lee all had birdie attempts on the 18th hole to try and get into a playoff, but none were successful.

“I had a really good start,” Ko said. “Making four birdies on the first five holes was really good, and I struggled in the holes after that, but you know, I tried to get myself together, and I made some bogeys in the wrong time, which wasn’t ideal, but I tried my best until the last.”

Link to article – 

Australian Webb rallies to claim Founders Cup golf

Masters champion Scott blows chance to top world rankings

(Reuters) – Adam Scott on Sunday blew a chance to defend his Masters title as the world number one, receiving a harsh reminder of the capricious nature of golf and the importance of putting.

Scott frittered away a three-shot lead in the final round at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, making just one birdie in a four-over-par 76 as he plunged to finish third behind winner Matt Every at Bay Hill in Orlando.

Instead of overtaking Tiger Woods at the top of the rankings and heading to Augusta in a fortnight as a clear favorite, the 33-year-old Australian again faces questions about the apparent fragility of his putting.

“I’m annoyed I didn’t putt at all well today,” Scott, who also blew a four-shot lead in the final round at the Australian Open less than four months ago, told Golf Channel.

“I really think the putting is let me down on both those occasions.

“Today was a bit shaky. My short game just wasn’t there, so that needs to tighten up. It probably shows I need to do a bit more work on it to hold up under the most pressure.”

Scott scored worse each day, shooting 62 68 71 76.

He had a seven-shot halfway lead and seemed headed for a massive victory. A final round one-over 73 would have been enough to win.

Nobody has blown such a large 36-hole lead on the PGA Tour since Tom Weiskopf also led by seven strokes at the 1975 Westchester Classic.

Scott drove the ball with his customary aplomb on Sunday, with the notable exception of the par-four third, where he yanked his tee shot into the water, but his iron play was inconsistent and putter cold.

He sank only one putt longer than seven feet, and shockingly missed a three-footer at the par-five 16th that would have pulled him back within a shot of the lead.

If there is one positive, it is that he will not suffer from complacency heading to the April 10-13 Masters.

“Playing in contention was fun and I definitely identified a couple of areas I’ll be working on the next couple of weeks,” he said.

“It was good to be back in the mix again. If nothing else, it’s a good reminder on how much putting practice I need to do going to the Masters and just how important it is.

“And if I think back to last year, I made every putt that you expect to in that last round and ultimately that’s maybe what gave me the chance to win.”

(Reporting By Andrew Both in Cary, North Carolina; Editing by Greg Stutchbury)

Excerpt from: 

Masters champion Scott blows chance to top world rankings

Every wins Arnold Palmer Invitational golf

Miami (AFP) – Adam Scott stumbled with a chance to all-but ensure himself of becoming world number one, leaving Matt Every to claim his first PGA title at the Arnold Palmer Invitational.

Reigning Masters champion Scott, who led by a record seven strokes through 36 holes and by three when the day began, struggled to a final-round four-over par 76 and settled for third.

“I really think the putting let me down,” Scott said on Sunday. “I am annoyed I didn’t putt at all today. Poor, just out of sorts for whatever reason.”

Scott, the first Australian to win the Masters green jacket, would likely have dethroned Tiger Woods atop the rankings days before he defended his first major crown next month at Augusta National.

Instead, tearful Every secured his first-ever berth at the Masters with an emotional comeback triumph by firing a final-round 70.

“It’s hard. It’s tough,” Every said as he wiped away tears. “You never know if it’s going to happen. It’s nice to get it done.”

Every won in his 93rd US PGA start, his best prior finishes being runner-up efforts in 2012 at the Texas Open and Children’s Miracle network Classic.

The 30-year-old from nearby Daytona Beach, whose father brought him to Bay Hill for years in his youth, took a $1 million top prize that was more than he had earned in any prior career season.

A week that saw 14-time major champion Woods withdraw due to a back injury ended with an emotional final charge.

Every led Scott by three strokes with three holes to play but found a cart path to the right off the 16th tee and hit a tree with his second shot on the way to a bogey.

As quickly as the door opened, Scott missed a 19-foot eagle putt and pulled a four-foot comeback birdie putt left of the cup at the par-5 16th while Every rescued par from a bunker at the par-3 17th, staying two ahead of Scott.

Scott missed a seven-foot par putt at 17 and even though Every closed with a bogey by missing a five-foot par putt, Scott’s par was not enough.

Scott said he knows what he needs to work on in practice and the driving range to get better.

“Today I was a bit shaky but this course was asking a lot of everyone,” Scott said. “My short game just wasn’t there so that needs to be tightened up.

“This shows I need to do a bit more work on it for it to hold up under the most pressure.”

Keegan Bradley, Scott’s playing partner, missed a 30-foot birdie putt at 18 which would have forced a playoff and Every had his long-sought win.

“(Missing) the last putt was a bummer but I’ll take it,” Every said.

Scott matched the course record with a 62 Thursday and equaled the 36-hole mark with a 68 Friday but saw his record seven-shot lead trimmed to three entering Sunday.

The Aussie found bunkers with his first two shots and missed a five-foot par putt at the first, dropping his lead to two shots.

Scott found water left off the third tee on his way to another bogey that trimmed his edge to one shot over Every.

Scott answered with a birdie of his own at the fourth to reach 14-under and lead by two, but he found a bunker off the tee at the par-3 eighth and took a bogey, slicing his lead back to one.

When Every sank a 20-foot birdie putt at the 10th and added an eight-foot birdie at the par-5 12th to reach 14-under, the seven-stroke edge Scott enjoyed on Saturday morning had totally vanished.

Scott fell two adrift when Every followed with a 13-foot birdie putt at 13 to reach 15-under.

When Scott took a bogey at the par-3 14th, Every’s advantage grew to three shots.

Original article – 

Every wins Arnold Palmer Invitational golf

Golf-Masters champion Scott blows chance to top world rankings

March 23 (Reuters) – Adam Scott on Sunday blew a chance to defend his Masters title as the world number one, receiving a harsh reminder of the capricious nature of golf and the importance of putting.

Scott frittered away a three-shot lead in the final round at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, making just one birdie in a four-over-par 76 as he plunged to finish third behind winner Matt Every at Bay Hill in Orlando.

Instead of overtaking Tiger Woods at the top of the rankings and heading to Augusta in a fortnight as a clear favorite, the 33-year-old Australian again faces questions about the apparent fragility of his putting.

“I’m annoyed I didn’t putt at all well today,” Scott, who also blew a four-shot lead in the final round at the Australian Open less than four months ago, told Golf Channel.

“I really think the putting is let me down on both those occasions.

“Today was a bit shaky. My short game just wasn’t there, so that needs to tighten up. It probably shows I need to do a bit more work on it to hold up under the most pressure.”

Scott scored worse each day, shooting 62 68 71 76.

He had a seven-shot halfway lead and seemed headed for a massive victory. A final round one-over 73 would have been enough to win.

Nobody has blown such a large 36-hole lead on the PGA Tour since Tom Weiskopf also led by seven strokes at the 1975 Westchester Classic.

Scott drove the ball with his customary aplomb on Sunday, with the notable exception of the par-four third, where he yanked his tee shot into the water, but his iron play was inconsistent and putter cold.

He sank only one putt longer than seven feet, and shockingly missed a three-footer at the par-five 16th that would have pulled him back within a shot of the lead.

If there is one positive, it is that he will not suffer from complacency heading to the April 10-13 Masters.

“Playing in contention was fun and I definitely identified a couple of areas I’ll be working on the next couple of weeks,” he said.

“It was good to be back in the mix again. If nothing else, it’s a good reminder on how much putting practice I need to do going to the Masters and just how important it is.

“And if I think back to last year, I made every putt that you expect to in that last round and ultimately that’s maybe what gave me the chance to win.”

(Reporting By Andrew Both in Cary, North Carolina; Editing by Greg Stutchbury)

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Golf-Masters champion Scott blows chance to top world rankings

American Every clinches upset victory over Scott

(Reuters) – An emotional Matt Every clinched his first PGA Tour victory in dramatic fashion when he surged past a faltering Adam Scott to win the $6.2 million Arnold Palmer Invitational by one stroke in Florida on Sunday.

“It’s tough man. You just never know if it’s going to happen,” a teary-eyed Every told NBC after edging fellow American Keegan Bradley at Bay Hill in Orlando.

Australian Scott, the Masters champion, finished third.

Every, who started the final round four strokes behind Scott, charged to the front with four birdies in a sizzling five-hole stretch around the turn.

The 30-year-old built a three-shot lead, before bogeying the 16th and 18th holes, missing a five-footer at the last that opened the door for Bradley.

Bradley, however, missed a 30-foot birdie putt that would have forced a playoff, while Scott finished two shots behind after a 76. Nobody in the top 25 shot a worse final round.

“You get there so many times and it’s nice to get it done,” said Every, who had a 70 to finish at 13-under-par 275.

“That (missed at the last) was a bummer. Would have been to celebrate there, but I’ll take it.”

Every grew up in nearby Daytona Beach and Bay Hill was the first place he ever watched a PGA Tour event.

SUSPENDED IN 2010

The PGA Tour suspended him for three months during his rookie season in 2010 for conduct unbecoming a professional after he and two others were arrested on misdemeanor charges of marijuana possession in Iowa.

The charges were later dropped but the PGA Tour suspension, which was announced by Every’s management company, remained.

“I don’t do drugs,” Every told reporters at a news conference at the Sony Open in Honolulu in 2012. “It was a crappy deal, man. Wrong place, wrong time, perfect storm, and you know, I got three months out of it. It’s over with. I’m not mad at the tour. They did what they had to do. I totally understand it. But it’s over with. …

“If one of my friends likes to smoke marijuana every now and then, I’m not going to say, well, you can’t be my friend anymore,” he added. “I don’t do it, but I don’t frown upon it.”

He also said he disagreed with how the PGA Tour handled his situation.

“If they would have thrown a month at me instead of three, that would have been nice,” Every said.

The PGA Tour did not comment.

Every lost his PGA Tour card that season and was relegated to the secondary tour for a year before earning his way back to the big stage.

Now he is off to the Masters, and $1.116 million richer after winning in his 93rd start on tour.

But it might never have been if not for a piece of luck at the par-four ninth on Sunday, where his drive went dangerously left and nearly out-of-bounds.

Instead, the ball narrowly stayed in-bounds and to the right of the cart path, bouncing forward almost 100 yards, from where he punched his second shot to 15 feet and made birdie to close within one shot at the turn.

Scott, meanwhile, was left to rue his inability to close the deal in his final start before defending his Masters title April 10-13.

The world number two, who had a chance to take over as world number one from Tiger Woods, led by eight strokes after 35 holes, but played the final 37 holes in four over.

His score got higher each day, as he shot 62 68 71 76.

His putter deserved him on Sunday, no more conspicuously than at the par-five 16th, where he had a chance to make an eagle and tie Every, only to three-putt from 20 feet.

(Reporting By Andrew Both in Cary, North Carolina; Editing by Gene Cherry)

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American Every clinches upset victory over Scott

Golf-American Every clinches upset victory over Scott

* Every wins first Tour event

* American surges as Scott falters

* Masters champion finishes third (Adds quotes and details)

March 23 (Reuters) – An emotional Matt Every clinched his first PGA Tour victory in dramatic fashion when he surged past a faltering Adam Scott to win the $6.2 million Arnold Palmer Invitational by one stroke in Florida on Sunday.

“It’s tough man. You just never know if it’s going to happen,” a teary-eyed Every told NBC after edging fellow American Keegan Bradley at Bay Hill in Orlando.

Australian Scott, the Masters champion, finished third.

Every, who started the final round four strokes behind Scott, charged to the front with four birdies in a sizzling five-hole stretch around the turn.

The 30-year-old built a three-shot lead, before bogeying the 16th and 18th holes, missing a five-footer at the last that opened the door for Bradley.

Bradley, however, missed a 30-foot birdie putt that would have forced a playoff, while Scott finished two shots behind after a 76. Nobody in the top 25 shot a worse final round.

“You get there so many times and it’s nice to get it done,” said Every, who had a 70 to finish at 13-under-par 275.

“That (missed at the last) was a bummer. Would have been to celebrate there, but I’ll take it.”

Every grew up in nearby Daytona Beach and Bay Hill was the first place he ever watched a PGA Tour event.

SUSPENDED IN 2010

The PGA Tour suspended him for three months during his rookie season in 2010 for conduct unbecoming a professional after he and two others were arrested on misdemeanor charges of marijuana possession in Iowa.

The charges were later dropped but the PGA Tour suspension, which was announced by Every’s management company, remained.

“I don’t do drugs,” Every told reporters at a news conference at the Sony Open in Honolulu in 2012. “It was a crappy deal, man. Wrong place, wrong time, perfect storm, and you know, I got three months out of it. It’s over with. I’m not mad at the tour. They did what they had to do. I totally understand it. But it’s over with. …

“If one of my friends likes to smoke marijuana every now and then, I’m not going to say, well, you can’t be my friend anymore,” he added. “I don’t do it, but I don’t frown upon it.”

He also said he disagreed with how the PGA Tour handled his situation.

“If they would have thrown a month at me instead of three, that would have been nice,” Every said.

The PGA Tour did not comment.

Every lost his PGA Tour card that season and was relegated to the secondary tour for a year before earning his way back to the big stage.

Now he is off to the Masters, and $1.116 million richer after winning in his 93rd start on tour.

But it might never have been if not for a piece of luck at the par-four ninth on Sunday, where his drive went dangerously left and nearly out-of-bounds.

Instead, the ball narrowly stayed in-bounds and to the right of the cart path, bouncing forward almost 100 yards, from where he punched his second shot to 15 feet and made birdie to close within one shot at the turn.

Scott, meanwhile, was left to rue his inability to close the deal in his final start before defending his Masters title April 10-13.

The world number two, who had a chance to take over as world number one from Tiger Woods, led by eight strokes after 35 holes, but played the final 37 holes in four over.

His score got higher each day, as he shot 62 68 71 76.

His putter deserved him on Sunday, no more conspicuously than at the par-five 16th, where he had a chance to make an eagle and tie Every, only to three-putt from 20 feet. (Reporting By Andrew Both in Cary, North Carolina; Editing by Gene Cherry)

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Golf-American Every clinches upset victory over Scott

Golf-U.S. PGA Tour Arnold Palmer Invitational scores

March 23 (Infostrada Sports) – Scores from the U.S. PGA Tour Arnold Palmer Invitational at the par-72 course on Sunday in Orlando, Florida

275 Matt Every (U.S.) 69 70 66 70

276 Keegan Bradley (U.S.) 71 67 66 72

277 Adam Scott (Australia) 62 68 71 76

278 Jason Kokrak (U.S.) 67 71 67 73

279 Francesco Molinari (Italy) 67 70 69 73

Henrik Stenson (Sweden) 69 73 69 68

Erik Compton (U.S.) 72 68 70 69

280 Brandt Snedeker (U.S.) 67 71 74 68

Ryo Ishikawa (Japan) 65 74 70 71

282 Graeme McDowell (Britain) 68 77 67 70

Sean O’Hair (U.S.) 71 75 69 67

Fredrik Jacobson (Sweden) 71 68 70 73

J.B. Holmes (U.S.) 68 69 72 73

283 Kevin Chappell (U.S.) 71 70 71 71

Lucas Glover (U.S.) 72 74 68 69

Kevin Na (U.S.) 70 71 71 71

George McNeill (U.S.) 71 72 69 71

Harris English (U.S.) 69 71 75 68

Matt Jones (Australia) 71 71 69 72

284 Gary Woodland (U.S.) 73 71 70 70

Brendan Steele (U.S.) 68 74 70 72

Ian Poulter (Britain) 68 71 69 76

Brian Davis (Britain) 70 74 71 69

Vijay Singh (Fiji) 72 73 68 71

Camilo Villegas (Colombia) 71 73 73 67

285 Nicholas Thompson (U.S.) 71 73 71 70

Davis Love III (U.S.) 70 73 69 73

Trevor Immelman (South Africa) 69 72 71 73

Brooks Koepka (U.S.) 74 70 72 69

Chesson Hadley (U.S.) 69 68 69 79

286 Retief Goosen (South Africa) 70 75 68 73

Marc Leishman (Australia) 72 74 69 71

Danny Lee (New Zealand) 71 72 73 70

Chris Stroud (U.S.) 73 69 72 72

287 Peter Hanson (Sweden) 75 69 71 72

Noh Seung-Yul (South Korea) 72 68 74 73

Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (Spain) 66 77 74 70

Luke Guthrie (U.S.) 71 71 74 71

Charles Howell III (U.S.) 68 71 72 76

Bryce Molder (U.S.) 72 72 69 74

Morgan Hoffmann (U.S.) 67 71 71 78

Aaron Baddeley (Australia) 70 70 70 77

288 Billy Horschel (U.S.) 70 74 69 75

Jhonattan Vegas (Venezuela) 70 72 75 71

Russell Knox (Britain) 71 71 72 74

Jamie Donaldson (Britain) 67 71 74 76

Sam Saunders (U.S.) 69 71 71 77

Charlie Beljan (U.S.) 72 72 70 74

John Merrick (U.S.) 65 74 76 73

Will MacKenzie (U.S.) 71 75 72 70

Zach Johnson (U.S.) 71 71 73 73

289 David Hearn (Canada) 70 72 73 74

David Lingmerth (Sweden) 75 71 69 74

Patrick Reed (U.S.) 69 73 70 77

John Senden (Australia) 72 74 71 72

290 Lee Janzen (U.S.) 72 73 74 71

Jason Bohn (U.S.) 73 73 72 72

Cameron Tringale (U.S.) 70 74 75 71

Zachary Olsen (U.S.) 73 71 72 74

291 Chris Kirk (U.S.) 69 72 72 78

Paul Casey (Britain) 67 79 72 73

Ryan Moore (U.S.) 68 72 78 73

Briny Baird (U.S.) 72 71 74 74

Brian Stuard (U.S.) 72 74 74 71

K.J. Choi (South Korea) 70 76 70 75

292 Stewart Cink (U.S.) 71 70 72 79

293 Rod Pampling (Australia) 73 72 71 77

Pat Perez (U.S.) 70 70 70 83

Padraig Harrington (Ireland) 70 70 73 80

294 Woody Austin (U.S.) 72 71 75 76

Michael Putnam (U.S.) 70 75 74 75

295 Tim Wilkinson (New Zealand) 71 74 77 73

Greg Owen (Britain) 76 69 74 76

296 Justin Hicks (U.S.) 78 68 71 79

Chad Campbell (U.S.) 69 77 73 77

297 Martin Laird (Britain) 71 72 76 78

Continued: 

Golf-U.S. PGA Tour Arnold Palmer Invitational scores

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