_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"caddywise.com","urls":{"Home":"http://caddywise.com","Category":"http://caddywise.com/category/uncategorized/","Archive":"http://caddywise.com/2018/02/","Post":"http://caddywise.com/trump-visits-shooting-victims-local-police-en-route-to-mar-a-lago-for-long-weekend/","Page":"http://caddywise.com/golf-caddy-scholarships/","Nav_menu_item":"http://caddywise.com/443/"}}_ap_ufee

Entries Tagged as ''

Spieth ‘very far away’ from top of golf’s world ranking

Rising star Jordan Spieth obliterated world number one Rory McIlroy by 15 strokes in his runaway Australian Open triumph, but says he is “very far away” from becoming the top-ranked player.

The 21-year-old Texan blitzed the field with a sizzling course record eight-under-par 63 to win the tournament on Sunday by six shots at 13-under 271.

Defending champion McIlroy, who beat world number three Adam Scott with a birdie at the final hole last year, wrestled with the course and the windy conditions and finished joint 15th at two-over 286.

It was an amazing performance from the young American, and left McIlroy and Scott flailing in his wake.

Spieth was runner-up at the US Masters last April behind fellow American Bubba Watson, narrowly missing out on being the first Masters rookie to win since Fuzzy Zoeller in 1979.

But he said he was a long way from challenging for the world number one ranking, even though he was expected to climb to 11 from 14 after his Australian triumph.

“I think I’m very far away. This week was big because I was able to close it out,” he said.

“I felt the pressure, I felt the nerves and performed the best I’ve ever performed and there’s a big difference from playing great at Augusta and coming up just short and closing out a tournament.

“It just feels completely different. Even though that week was one of the most memorable of my golfing career it still wasn’t a win and it still wasn’t the same feeling that it was this week walking down the 18th fairway,” he added.

“In order to do this in majors it’s going to take a lot more than it took this week.

“I still believe I am far away because I believe I have to win a major or two in order to significantly progress to that goal of being world number one and so now I look to April (Augusta Masters).”

– Peak of career –

McIlroy’s resurgence kicked off at the Australian Open last year, when he edged Scott for his first tournament win of 2013.

The Northern Irishman went on to win two majors (the British Open and the US PGA Championship), a World Golf Championship title (WGC-Bridgestone) and the flagship event of the European Tour (BMW PGA Championship) to finish this season at the summit of the world rankings.

“I take a lot of confidence from that knowing that this course was challenging for everybody, including world number one and number three,” Spieth said.

“Hall of Famers, that’s what I think when I look at this (Stonehaven Cup), you just see those names on this trophy and you don’t see that on every trophy and it’s real cool that my name will go on here.

“This is the peak of where I’ve ever been as a golfer and it’s really cool and hopefully I can work some more to climb some more peaks.

“If I had the follow-up year that Rory had this year then I would be pleased next year.”

Spieth said he would “certainly” be coming back to defend his Australian crown at the same course in 2015.

It was a torrid time for McIlroy as his title defence crumbled around him.

“It’s been tough all weekend, but going out there, I was trying to get something going but with the pin positions and the wind, it was just very hard to get the ball close to the hole,” he said.

“Anything under par would have been a good score. I just really couldn’t get anything going.

“I hit a few loose shots again but yeah, just wasn’t meant to be this year.”

Excerpt from: 

Spieth ‘very far away’ from top of golf’s world ranking

Local hero Thaworn wears the crown in Thailand

(Reuters) – Local hero Thaworn Wiratchant carded a five-under-par 67 in the final round to win the King’s Cup in Thailand by two strokes on Sunday for his 18th title on the Asian Tour.

The veteran Thai, trailing India’s Anirban Lahiri by a stroke after the third round, mixed six birdies with a lone bogey in the last round for a four-day total of 20-under 268.

Lahiri, who had the lead for the first three days, finished tied second with Australia’s Andrew Dodt on 18-under.

The 47-year-old Thaworn gained five shots in the first 10 holes before he had his only bogey on the 12th.

Going into the final hole with a one-shot lead over Lahiri and Dodt, he killed the chances of a play-off with a birdie.

“It was not easy out there as Anirban and Andrew were piling the pressure on me,” Thaworn told reporters.

“It got a little shaky on 12 when I bogeyed for the first time today. I really wanted to birdie 18 as I did not want to go into a play-off. I was confident of winning in regulation play but not in a play-off.”

(Writing by Sudipto Ganguly in Mumbai; editing by Martyn Herman)

Original article:

Local hero Thaworn wears the crown in Thailand

American Spieth buries weekend woes at Australian Open

By Nick Mulvenney

SYDNEY (Reuters) – American prodigy Jordan Spieth said closing out his victory at the Australian Open in such spectacular style on Sunday was a major step on the path that he hopes will take him to the top of the world rankings one day.

The 21-year-old Texan marked himself out as a future major champion when, on debut, he led by two strokes at one stage in the final round of the U.S. Masters in April and ended up sharing second behind Bubba Watson.

After he had a share of the lead at the start of the final round at the Players’ Championship in May only to shoot a 74 for a share of fourth, however, golf pundits started talking about his “weekend troubles”.

There were no such problems on Sunday, though, as he simply blew away a field containing the current world numbers one and three in difficult conditions with a flawless round of eight-under-par 63 to win the Stonehaven Cup by six strokes.

“This week was big because I was able to close it out, I felt the pressure, felt the nerves and performed the best I’ve ever performed,” he told reporters after what he described as his best ever round.

“There’s a big difference between being great at Augusta and coming up just short and closing out a tournament. It just feels completely different.

“Even though that week was one of the most memorable of my career, it still wasn’t the same as this week and walking down the 18th.”

CLOSE CALLS

Shortly after he turned professional at 19, Spieth became the youngest player in 82 years to win a PGA Tour event at the John Deere Classic and was named PGA Rookie of the Year in 2013.

Despite his brilliant week at Augusta, eight top-10 finishes on the PGA Tour and a Ryder Cup debut, however, he looked like ending 2014 season winless.

“There’s been a lot of close calls from the last time I won until now and I’d be lying if I didn’t say it was eating at me a little bit,” he said.

“It’s tough when you get so close at big events and you are not able to pull it off and I decided to take care of business by a healthy amount today.”

Rory McIlroy used his victory at Royal Sydney last year as a springboard to a stellar 2014, in which he won the British Open and U.S. PGA Championship and regained the number one ranking.

“If I had the follow-up year Rory had this year, I think I’d be pleased,” he added with a grin.

Read More: 

American Spieth buries weekend woes at Australian Open

American Spieth runaway winner of Australian Open

Rising American star Jordan Spieth dominated the final round to win the Australian Open by six shots and leave world number one Rory McIlroy and third-ranked Adam Scott floundering in his wake on Sunday.

Spieth carded a sizzling new course record of eight-under par 63 to finish the Aus$1.25 million ($1.06 million) OneAsia co-sanctioned tournament at 13-under 271.

It was 21-year-old Texan’s second tournament win after last year’s John Deere Classic in Illinois.

Spieth was runner-up at the Masters last April behind fellow American Bubba Watson, just missing out on being the first Masters rookie to win since Fuzzy Zoeller in 1979.

“There’s been a lot of close calls from the last time I won until now. It would be a lie if I didn’t say that it was eating at me a little bit,” Spieth said.

“It’s tough when you get so close so many times in big events against world-class fields and you’re not able to pull it off.

“I decided to take care of business today. It was just one of those rounds where I was in the zone and just focusing on each shot.

“At no point was I upset, it was very stress-free.”

Spieth took a grip on the final round with three consecutive birdies from the fifth to the seventh holes to go nine under and led by three strokes at the turn.

He had few problems holding on to his advantage in the homeward nine with four more birdies in his closing five holes.

With his commanding victory, Spieth’s world ranking is expected to climb from 14 to 11.

“I certainly have not played better than today. I felt it coming on last week (in Japan), striking the ball very well and my putter was close,” he said.

“I came into here with a lot of confidence and I had my coach here and so I knew that having him to cope with the little things that this could be a really good week.”

Spieth finished the 72 holes of the tournament with 22 birdies and just nine bogeys.

– Scott double trouble –

Australian Rod Pampling finished second at seven-under 277 with Brett Rumford third on six-under 278 and Greg Chalmers in fourth on five-under 279.

Scott lost momentum with a double-bogey seven at the fifth hole to drop back to two under and could make little headway on the tearaway leader to finish fifth with four-under 280.

The world number three had to take a penalty drop for an unplayable lie after blocking his tee shot into rough and then hooked his next shot back into the trees on the left.

He speared through a narrow opening but was unable to get up and down, the double-bogey leaving Scott five behind Spieth at that stage.

Defending champion McIlroy, who beat Scott with a birdie at the final hole at Royal Sydney last year, wrestled with the course and the windy conditions and finished joint 15th at two-over 286, 15 strokes behind Spieth.

It was a torrid week for McIlroy, who carded 15 birdies, an eagle, 14 bogeys, one double bogey and a disastrous triple bogey.

Only eight players finished under par over the 72 holes at the demanding Jack-Nicklaus designed course.

Spieth joins past winners of the Stonehaven Cup such as greats Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player, Greg Norman, Tom Watson and Peter Thomson.

He is the first American to win the Australian Open since Brad Faxon in 1993.

Spieth won the John Deere Classic aged 19, becoming the first teenaged winner of a US PGA Tour event since 1931.

The Australian trio of Rumford, Pampling and two-time winner Chalmers qualified for next year’s British Open at St Andrews as the top three non-exempt players.

Taken from:

American Spieth runaway winner of Australian Open

Spectacular Spieth walks away with Australian Open

By Nick Mulvenney

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rising American talent Jordan Spieth shot the round of his life for an eight-under-par 63 as his rivals labored in the Sydney wind to claim his second professional title by six strokes at the Australian Open on Sunday.

The Texan, who shared second place on his U.S. Masters debut in April, fired eight birdies in a flawless final round to secure the Stonehaven Cup at 13-under 271 for the tournament at The Australian Golf Club.

The A$1.25 million ($1.06 million) tournament had been billed as a duel between world number one Rory McIlroy and number three Adam Scott but 21-year-old Spieth stole the show with his stunning final round.

The world number 14 was the youngest Australian Open champion since Aaron Baddeley won his second title as a teenager in 2000 and the first American since Brad Faxon in 1993, when Spieth was just a few months old.

“I didn’t think the round was out there but the putts just kept going in,” Spieth said in the greenside presentation. “It’s the best round I’ve ever played, the best win I’ve ever had, it’s pretty awesome.”

Spieth’s final round score was a record on the newly-reconfigured course but a better indication of its quality was that only seven other players finished under par for the tournament.

Australian Rod Pampling hit a 68 for second place, a shot better than compatriot Brad Rumford (70) in third with another local Greg Chalmers (71) in fourth on five-under. All three secured berths at next year’s British Open at St Andrews.

Scott (71) was fifth on four under, while defending champion McIlroy, whose victory at the Royal Sydney last year provided a springboard for his stellar 2014, finished 15 shots off the pace in a share of 15th after a 72.

Starting the day in a three-way tie for the lead at five-under, Spieth quickly eased ahead of his rivals with his first birdie at the third.

After parring the fourth, he really put his foot on the gas and drained birdie putts of 10, five and 15 feet on the next three holes to open up a gap of four shots over the field.

There were no more birdies — but crucially in the difficult conditions no bogeys — until the 14th but that started another strong run and he picked up three more shots on the run-in.

(Editing by John O’Brien)

View article – 

Spectacular Spieth walks away with Australian Open

McIlroy still upbeat despite mid-round collapse in Sydney

By Nick Mulvenney

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rory McIlroy suffered a spectacular two-hole meltdown in the third round of the Australian Open on Saturday but he was not quite ready to give up on his title defence after windy conditions kept his rivals in check.

The world number one plummeted down the leaderboard when he dropped a combined five shots at the ninth and 10th holes but even a five-over-par 76 left him just six shots off the pace going into Sunday’s final round.

“I need a fast start tomorrow to have a chance,” he told reporters. “It depends too on what the guys ahead of me do. I need some help. But the greens have been firmer every day. So a low score is higher than it was.

“I still feel like I can shoot a good one. I just don’t know if that will be enough. I’ll be trying my best. It’s the last round of the season so it would be nice to make it a good one.”

McIlroy had stayed among the leaders for his first eight holes, sinking a couple of clutch par putts and rebounding from a bogey at the fourth with a birdie at the next which could have been an eagle had he not lipped out with the putt.

His driving had been erratic, though, and he paid the full price for it at the ninth.

He launched his tee shot into a reedy thicket and his first attempt to extricate the ball left it wedged under some matting, forcing him to take a drop with a two-putt on the green leading to a triple bogey.

At the 10th, he found the woods from the tee, again failed to get back on the fairway with his first effort and coming up short with a 10 foot putt for bogey.

“It was a tough day obviously,” he said. “The wind was up. I was doing okay, steady enough, until I got to the ninth. I hit a wayward tee shot into what I thought was a decent enough lie that I could advance the ball.

“But I didn’t realise what I was standing on is not like dirt or earth. It was more like carpet. So the ball went underneath the carpet. Had it been a normal surface it would have been alright, but down there it was impossible.”

(Editing by John O’Brien)

See the article here:

McIlroy still upbeat despite mid-round collapse in Sydney

Golf-McIlroy still upbeat despite mid-round collapse in Sydney

(Repeats changing headline)

By Nick Mulvenney

SYDNEY, Nov 29 (Reuters) – Rory McIlroy suffered a spectacular two-hole meltdown in the third round of the Australian Open on Saturday but he was not quite ready to give up on his title defence after windy conditions kept his rivals in check.

The world number one plummeted down the leaderboard when he dropped a combined five shots at the ninth and 10th holes but even a five-over-par 76 left him just six shots off the pace going into Sunday’s final round.

“I need a fast start tomorrow to have a chance,” he told reporters. “It depends too on what the guys ahead of me do. I need some help. But the greens have been firmer every day. So a low score is higher than it was.

“I still feel like I can shoot a good one. I just don’t know if that will be enough. I’ll be trying my best. It’s the last round of the season so it would be nice to make it a good one.”

McIlroy had stayed among the leaders for his first eight holes, sinking a couple of clutch par putts and rebounding from a bogey at the fourth with a birdie at the next which could have been an eagle had he not lipped out with the putt.

His driving had been erratic, though, and he paid the full price for it at the ninth.

He launched his tee shot into a reedy thicket and his first attempt to extricate the ball left it wedged under some matting, forcing him to take a drop with a two-putt on the green leading to a triple bogey.

At the 10th, he found the woods from the tee, again failed to get back on the fairway with his first effort and coming up short with a 10 foot putt for bogey.

“It was a tough day obviously,” he said. “The wind was up. I was doing okay, steady enough, until I got to the ninth. I hit a wayward tee shot into what I thought was a decent enough lie that I could advance the ball.

“But I didn’t realise what I was standing on is not like dirt or earth. It was more like carpet. So the ball went underneath the carpet. Had it been a normal surface it would have been alright, but down there it was impossible.” (Editing by John O’Brien)

Link: 

Golf-McIlroy still upbeat despite mid-round collapse in Sydney

McIlroy still alive in Sydney despite mid-round collapse

By Nick Mulvenney

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rory McIlroy suffered a spectacular two-hole meltdown in the third round of the Australian Open on Saturday but he was not quite ready to give up on his title defence after windy conditions kept his rivals in check.

The world number one plummeted down the leaderboard when he dropped a combined five shots at the ninth and 10th holes but even a five-over-par 76 left him just six shots off the pace going into Sunday’s final round.

“I need a fast start tomorrow to have a chance,” he told reporters. “It depends too on what the guys ahead of me do. I need some help. But the greens have been firmer every day. So a low score is higher than it was.

“I still feel like I can shoot a good one. I just don’t know if that will be enough. I’ll be trying my best. It’s the last round of the season so it would be nice to make it a good one.”

McIlroy had stayed among the leaders for his first eight holes, sinking a couple of clutch par putts and rebounding from a bogey at the fourth with a birdie at the next which could have been an eagle had he not lipped out with the putt.

His driving had been erratic, though, and he paid the full price for it at the ninth.

He launched his tee shot into a reedy thicket and his first attempt to extricate the ball left it wedged under some matting, forcing him to take a drop with a two-putt on the green leading to a triple bogey.

At the 10th, he found the woods from the tee, again failed to get back on the fairway with his first effort and coming up short with a 10 foot putt for bogey.

“It was a tough day obviously,” he said. “The wind was up. I was doing okay, steady enough, until I got to the ninth. I hit a wayward tee shot into what I thought was a decent enough lie that I could advance the ball.

“But I didn’t realise what I was standing on is not like dirt or earth. It was more like carpet. So the ball went underneath the carpet. Had it been a normal surface it would have been alright, but down there it was impossible.”

Link to article: 

McIlroy still alive in Sydney despite mid-round collapse

World champ Hamilton nominated for BBC award

London (AFP) – Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton will battle with the likes of European Ryder Cup star Rory McIlroy and Real Madrid’s Gareth Bale for the BBC’s prestigious 2014 Sports Personality of the Year award.

Hamilton secured his second F1 world title in Abu Dhabi at the weekend and the British driver is expected to be a leading contender for the prize.

Wales winger Bale, who helped Madrid win the Champions League last season in his first year with the Spanish giants, and British Open and US PGA Championship winner McIlroy, a key member of the European team that retained the Ryder Cup against the United States, will be also be in the running.

McIlroy is bidding to become the first golfer to win the award since Nick Faldo in 1989.

Athlete Jo Pavey, dressage star Charlotte Dujardin, boxer Carl Froch, visually impaired skier Kelly Gallagher, swimmer Adam Peaty, gymnast Max Whitlock and skeleton bob racer Lizzy Yarnold complete the 10-strong list for the annual prize.

The shortlist was decided by a panel of former nominees, newspaper sports editors and television sport executives.

Bookmakers have Northern Ireland’s McIlroy as the early front runner and William Hill’s spokesman Rupert Adams said: “Even at this early stage it looks like a two horse race and Rory is already a couple of lengths ahead.”

Andy Murray, who won Wimbledon last year, was voted the 2013 Sports Personality of the year and his successor will be revealed, following a public vote, at the awards ceremony in Glasgow on December 14.

Continue reading here – 

World champ Hamilton nominated for BBC award

Obama awards Medal of Freedom to 18, including Streep, Wonder

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama on Monday presented the highest U.S. civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, to 18 artists, politicians, writers, scholars and activists, including actress Meryl Streep and singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder.

“Not only have they made the world better, but by following their example they make us a little bit better every single day. We are truly grateful to them,” the president said in a White House ceremony.

The group included Ethel Kennedy, widow of the late Senator Robert Kennedy; NBC journalist Tom Brokaw; and Representative John Dingell, a Michigan Democrat and the longest-serving member of Congress. Dingell is retiring at the end of the year.

Others recognized at the ceremony were author Isabel Allende, Native American activist Suzan Harjo and former U.S. Representative and federal judge Abner Mikva of Illinois.

Also receiving awards were actress and humanitarian Marlo Thomas, Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert Solow, pioneering black golfer Charles Sifford and physicist Mildred Dresselhaus.

Posthumous medals were awarded to six people, among them civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner. They were killed in 1964 as they participated in a voter registration drive in Mississippi.

Other posthumous awards went to choreographer Alvin Ailey and to Representatives Patsy Mink of Hawaii, a sponsor of Title IX legislation banning sexual discrimination in higher education, and Edward Roybal of California, founder of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

Obama said composer Stephen Sondheim was to have received the medal but could not attend the ceremony. He will receive it next year, he said.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is reserved for individuals who have made “meritorious contributions” to U.S. security, world peace or cultural endeavors.

(Reporting by Ian Simpson; Editing by Peter Cooney)

See the article here: 

Obama awards Medal of Freedom to 18, including Streep, Wonder

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor