_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"caddywise.com","urls":{"Home":"http://caddywise.com","Category":"http://caddywise.com/category/uncategorized/","Archive":"http://caddywise.com/2018/02/","Post":"http://caddywise.com/trump-visits-shooting-victims-local-police-en-route-to-mar-a-lago-for-long-weekend/","Page":"http://caddywise.com/golf-caddy-scholarships/","Nav_menu_item":"http://caddywise.com/443/"}}_ap_ufee

Entries Tagged as ''

Trump's Most Damaging Tweet

TV shows, movies and more on Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.” data-reactid=”7″>Watch TV shows, movies and more on Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

Watch how Donald Trump’s early-morning tweet about Pres. Obama tapping his “wires” has evolved into a scandal that’s consumed the Trump White House, the House Intelligence Committee and even Speaker Paul Ryan.


The Last Word with Lawrence O' Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O’ Donnell

Lawrence O’Donnell brings his extraordinary background in politics and entertainment to “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell,” airing weeknights on MSNBC. Drawing upon his experience as a former chief of staff on the Senate Finance Committee and as an Emmy-winning executive producer and writer of “The West Wing,” O’Donnell gives the last word and rewrites the most compelling stories of the day.

Credit:  

Trump's Most Damaging Tweet

White House on Syrian president: ‘There is a political reality we have to accept’


White House on Syrian president: ‘There is a political reality we have to accept’

Yahoo News Video

During the daily White House press briefing on Friday, Yahoo’s Chief Washington Correspondent Olivier Knox asked press secretary Sean Spicer about how President Trump views Syrian President Bashar Assad’s legitimacy.

View article:  

White House on Syrian president: ‘There is a political reality we have to accept’

Intelligence Suggests ISIS May Have Gained Access to Airport Security Screening Equipment to Test Bombs

TV shows, movies and more on Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.” data-reactid=”7″>Watch TV shows, movies and more on Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

The major concern going forward is that these bombs inside electronic devices may rival those constructed by al-Qaeda.


ABC World News Tonight With David Muir

ABC World News Tonight With David Muir

World News brings the latest information and analysis of major events from around the country and the world.

Original article: 

Intelligence Suggests ISIS May Have Gained Access to Airport Security Screening Equipment to Test Bombs

Hiker Who Saved Baby Bear With CPR Has No Regrets Despite Jail Threat: 'He Was Fighting to Survive'

to save a baby black bear he encountered on a trail has opened up about his deed, saying he would do it again.” data-reactid=”7″>The hiker who risked a year in jail to save a baby black bear he encountered on a trail has opened up about his deed, saying he would do it again.

Read: Real Life Sharknado? Fish Out of Water Winds Up on the Road Following Cyclone” data-reactid=”8″>Read: Real Life Sharknado? Fish Out of Water Winds Up on the Road Following Cyclone

Photographer Corey Hancock was hiking a scenic trail in Oregon when he came across a frail 3-month-old baby bear Monday night.

“I didn’t have a choice, I wouldn’t have left it out there,” he told Inside Edition. “He seemed to be abandoned and dying. He was hardly moving at first when I walked up on him. I thought was dead.”

weighing just five pounds, looked certain to die. Hancock decided to rescue him and carried him for more than two miles.” data-reactid=”11″>The cub, weighing just five pounds, looked certain to die. Hancock decided to rescue him and carried him for more than two miles.

“I was carrying this little lifeless creature in my arms kind of wondering if he was going to make it,” he said. “I tried to give it CPR. I gave it a few rescue puffs and pushed on his chest. He took one breath. He was fighting to survive.”

Hancock drove the bear to a wildlife center near Salem, Ore., where he is recovering well but can never be returned to the wild. Animal experts believe the hiker was out of line.

Read: Raccoon With Head Stuck in Sewer Rescued With Jaws of Life, Crowbars and Sledgehammer” data-reactid=”14″>Read: Raccoon With Head Stuck in Sewer Rescued With Jaws of Life, Crowbars and Sledgehammer

Interfering with wildlife and taking them out of their natural habitat is illegal, according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The good Samaritan could have been fined $6,000 or even been sent to jail for a year.

bond with that little bear,” will not be punished for what he did.” data-reactid=”16″>On Wednesday, the Oregon State Police said that Hancock, who says he felt “a special bond with that little bear,” will not be punished for what he did.

Watch: Beloved Polar Bear Practices Plunges and Handstands in Freezing Pool” data-reactid=”17″>Watch: Beloved Polar Bear Practices Plunges and Handstands in Freezing Pool

Related Articles:

Excerpt from: 

Hiker Who Saved Baby Bear With CPR Has No Regrets Despite Jail Threat: 'He Was Fighting to Survive'

Immunity in Presidential Scandals Has Complicated History

TV shows, movies and more on Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.” data-reactid=”7″>Watch TV shows, movies and more on Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

Michael Beschloss, NBC News presidential historian, talks with Rachel Maddow about the historical precedent for immunity granted in a presidential scandal.


The Rachel Maddow Show

The Rachel Maddow Show

Launched in 2008, “The Rachel Maddow Show” follows the machinations of policy making in America, from local political activism to international diplomacy. Rachel Maddow looks past the distractions of political theater and stunts and focuses on the legislative proposals and policies that shape American life – as well as the people making and influencing those policies and their ultimate outcome, intended or otherwise.

Link:

Immunity in Presidential Scandals Has Complicated History

Cards Against Humanity Creator Vows To Publish Browsing History Of U.S. Representatives

pledged to purchase and publish the internet browsing history of members of Congress who voted to repeal an Obama-era protection that prevented internet service providers from collecting and selling users’ personal information.” data-reactid=”14″>The creator of the popular card game Cards Against Humanity has pledged to purchase and publish the internet browsing history of members of Congress who voted to repeal an Obama-era protection that prevented internet service providers from collecting and selling users’ personal information.

wrote on Twitter.” data-reactid=”15″>Max Temkin issued the threat earlier this week after the Senate voted to roll back the privacy protections for your browsing data. “If this shit passes I will buy the browser history of every congressman and congressional aide and publish it,” Temkin wrote on Twitter.

Congress Decides To Kill Rules Preventing ISPs From Collecting, Selling Data” data-reactid=”16″>Read: Congress Decides To Kill Rules Preventing ISPs From Collecting, Selling Data

footsteps of the Senate by voting primarily on party lines to repeal the Broadband Consumer Privacy Act. The bill now heads to the desk of President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it into law.” data-reactid=”17″>Temkin will have his chance to make good on his threat, as the U.S. House of Representatives followed in the footsteps of the Senate by voting primarily on party lines to repeal the Broadband Consumer Privacy Act. The bill now heads to the desk of President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it into law.

news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.” data-reactid=”20″>For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

Telecommunications Act explicitly prohibits companies from sharing “individually identifiable” information, save for a couple specific situations.” data-reactid=”21″>However, it’s worth noting that this likely isn’t possible. In most cases, data is at least somewhat anonymized—though often not anonymized enough for the liking of the privacy minded. The Telecommunications Act explicitly prohibits companies from sharing “individually identifiable” information, save for a couple specific situations.

The new broadband privacy bill effectively killed off protections put in place by the Federal Communications Commission under the leadership of Barack Obama-appointee Tom Wheeler that would have required ISPs to ask for permission before collecting any sensitive information including web browsing history.

With those rules eliminated, ISPs will be able to continue to collect information about user activities. Temkin wants to turn the tables on the legislators that made that possible by getting ahold of their own data.

How To Protect Your Browsing History: Internet Service Providers Argue Against Your Privacy” data-reactid=”24″>Read: How To Protect Your Browsing History: Internet Service Providers Argue Against Your Privacy

According to Temkin, “IP blocks of congressmen and congressional staffers are known” and he would intend to purchase those blocks to publish.” data-reactid=”25″>According to Temkin, “IP blocks of congressmen and congressional staffers are known” and he would intend to purchase those blocks to publish.

said on Twitter.” data-reactid=”26″>Temkin did warn against crowdfunding campaigns promising to collectively purchase the browsing history of U.S. legislators. “Be wary of Kickstarters to buy this data, it doesn’t exist and isn’t for sale yet. Nobody knows what they’re talking about,” he said on Twitter.

raised $165,000 and another that has raised $70,000 —money that likely will not go toward its intended purpose.” data-reactid=”27″>Several crowdfunding efforts have cropped up in the days following the repeal of the Broadband Consumer Privacy Rules, including a GoFundMe that has raised $165,000 and another that has raised $70,000 —money that likely will not go toward its intended purpose.

  • Senate Votes To Kill Privacy Rules, Allow ISPs To Collect And Sell Sensitive Customer Data
  • Advertisers Lobby Congress To Roll Back Privacy Protections For Broadband Customers
  • Continue reading:  

    Cards Against Humanity Creator Vows To Publish Browsing History Of U.S. Representatives

    Read President Trump’s executive orders in full

    President Trump has begun his presidency with a number of executive orders released in a whirlwind of announcements. Below you’ll find the full text along with summaries of some of the more notable declarations, as provided by the White House and Federal Register websites.

    March 30: Opioids

    STAT)” data-reactid=”11″>Summary: To create a panel to combat America’s opioid crisis. The panel’s mission would be to identify federal funding streams that could be directed to address the crisis, for everything from medical treatments to long-term support services. The commission would also aim to identify areas in the United States with limited treatment options, review ways to prevent opioid addiction — including possible changes to prescribing practices — and consider changes to the criminal justice system to provide support for incarcerated individuals after their release from prison. (STAT)

    March 6: Revised travel ban

    The updated version of the travel ban after the original was struck down in court. The order temporarily halts immigration from six majority-Muslim countries, down from the seven in January’s language (Iraq was removed from the list). When the ban goes into effect on March 16, it revokes the January 27 order.” data-reactid=”15″>Summary: The updated version of the travel ban after the original was struck down in court. The order temporarily halts immigration from six majority-Muslim countries, down from the seven in January’s language (Iraq was removed from the list). When the ban goes into effect on March 16, it revokes the January 27 order.

    Feb. 8: Trio of law enforcement-related executive orders

    Associated Press)” data-reactid=”19″>Summary: One executive order announced Thursday directs the Justice Department to define new federal crimes, and increase penalties for existing ones, to further protect local and federal officers from acts of violence. Another order calls for the creation of a task force to reduce violent crime — even though the murder rate has declined sharply in recent decades — and a third is aimed at dismantling international drug cartels. Taken together, the directives, announced amid a national dialogue about racial bias in policing and appropriate police use of force, suggest that the White House wants to prioritize law and order and align itself closely with local law enforcement. (Associated Press)

    Feb. 3: Fiduciary Duty Rule/Core principles for regulating the United States financial system

    Bloomberg)” data-reactid=”24″>Summary: President Donald Trump will halt an Obama administration regulation, hated by the financial industry, that requires retirement advisers to work in the best interests of their clients, while the new administration reviews the rule. The president also will order a review of Dodd-Frank Act rules enacted in response to the 2008 financial crisis. Trump’s directive stalls the so-called fiduciary rule — set to take effect in April — that the Obama administration said would protect millions of retirees from being steered into inappropriate high-cost or high-risk investments that generate bigger profits for brokers. (Bloomberg)

    Jan. 30: Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs

    Reuters)” data-reactid=”28″>Summary: Major regulations are typically reviewed by the White House’s Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before they are issued. That review will continue under this new measure, but agencies will also have to identify which two regulations will be repealed to offset the costs of any new rule. (Reuters)

    Jan. 27: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States

    challenged successfully by civil liberty groups, but Trump has defended the order and mocked Sen. Chuck Schumer for crying at one of the many antiban protests. As the protests sprang up across the country, former President Barack Obama released a statement saying that he was “heartened by the level of engagement taking place.”” data-reactid=”32″>Summary: This act limited immigration from seven majority-Muslim countries. The ban has been challenged successfully by civil liberty groups, but Trump has defended the order and mocked Sen. Chuck Schumer for crying at one of the many antiban protests. As the protests sprang up across the country, former President Barack Obama released a statement saying that he was “heartened by the level of engagement taking place.”

    Jan. 27: Rebuilding the U.S. Armed Forces

    President Trump’s order to review and expand the military, including potential overhauls of nuclear deterrent and missile defense systems.” data-reactid=”36″>Summary: President Trump’s order to review and expand the military, including potential overhauls of nuclear deterrent and missile defense systems.

    Jan. 25: Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements/Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States

    Trump said. “A nation without borders is not a nation. Beginning today, the United States of America gets back control of its borders, gets back its borders.”” data-reactid=”40″>Summary: President Trump’s order to begin construction of the wall and detention facilities along the Mexican border while limiting funding to sanctuary cities. “I believe the steps we will take starting right now will improve the safety in both our countries, going to be very, very good for Mexico,” Trump said. “A nation without borders is not a nation. Beginning today, the United States of America gets back control of its borders, gets back its borders.”

    Jan. 24: Construction of American Pipelines

    continue the construction of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines, and to use American-made products when doing so to the extent possible.” data-reactid=”46″>Summary: President Trump’s orders to continue the construction of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines, and to use American-made products when doing so to the extent possible.

    Jan. 23: Hiring Freeze

    Jan. 23: Mexico City Policy

    Time)” data-reactid=”54″>Summary: The Mexico City Policy prohibits foreign aid from the U.S. to be given to any nongovernmental organization (NGO) abroad that discusses abortion as a family planning option. Currently, taxpayer dollars cannot be used to fund abortion procedures in other countries, but the order expands that oversight and also prohibits organizations from receiving U.S. family planning funding if they offer abortion counseling or advocate for abortion rights in other countries — even if the medical procedure is legal in that country. (Time)

    Jan. 23: Withdrawal of the United States From the Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations and Agreement

    AFP)” data-reactid=”58″>Summary: President Trump’s order to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations and agreement, which included the United States, Australia, Canada, Japan, Vietnam and seven other allies. (AFP)

    Jan. 20: Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal

    Associated Press)” data-reactid=”62″>Summary: The order directs federal agencies to stop issuing regulations that would expand the law’s reach. And it directs them to grant waivers, exemptions and delays of provisions in the Affordable Care Act that would impose costs on states or individuals, potentially including the law’s penalties on people who remain uninsured — a key provision. The order also says federal agencies must allow states greater flexibility in carrying out the health care programs. (Associated Press)

    View original:  

    Read President Trump’s executive orders in full

    Jewish teen arrested for US bomb threats 'has tumour'

    Rishon Lezion (Israel) (AFP) – An Israeli-American teenager accused of making dozens of anti-Semitic bomb threats that led to concern and a backlash in the United States has autism and a brain tumour, his lawyer told a court Thursday.

    The Israeli court extended the 18-year-old’s remand at the hearing in Rishon Lezion, near Tel Aviv, to April 6 following the Jewish teenager’s arrest in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon on March 23.

    His father, also arrested as part of the investigation, was released as the probe that has involved the FBI continues.

    A gag order prevents their identities from being published.

    Their arrests followed a wave of bomb threats to American Jewish institutions since the start of the year, which helped spread fears over whether hate crimes and anti-Semitic acts have been on the increase in the country.

    Some have said that the rise of Donald Trump as US president has encouraged the extreme right and emboldened hate groups.

    The arrest of a Jewish teenager over dozens of the threats has however complicated the debate.

    His alleged motive is unclear, but his lawyer, Shira Nir, highlighted his medical condition, which she said may have led him to wrongdoing through no fault of his own.

    She showed the court an image of what appeared to be a tumour on the right side of his brain, but gave no medical details.

    “The tumour is in a place where it’s very dangerous to operate,” she told the court, while also saying he suffered from autism.

    She said he had fallen asleep at one point as police questioned him and officers handled him roughly, resulting in bruises on his face.

    Police denied the accusations.

    Turning down Nir’s request that he be moved to house arrest under his mother’s supervision, judge Amit Michles said that the accused was suspected of carrying out offences “for years while his parents were in the home.”

    As he was being led out of court, his legs shackled, he stumbled and his mother burst into tears at the back of the room.

    The judge ordered police to provide the prison service with his medical records after Nir said guards had not been made aware of his condition.

    The suspect is a dual US-Israeli citizen.

    Police say he is behind a range of threats against Jewish community centres and other buildings linked to Jewish communities in the United States in recent months.

    The teenager is also suspected of being behind similar threats in New Zealand and Australia.

    In addition, police say he is suspected of a bomb threat to Delta Airlines in February 2015 which led to an emergency landing.

    Police said he used voice-disguising technology when making calls. Authorities have seized computer equipment and other items.

    From: 

    Jewish teen arrested for US bomb threats 'has tumour'

    China says 'no such thing' as man-made islands in South China Sea

    BEIJING (Reuters) – There was “no such thing” as man-made islands in the disputed South China Sea, China’s Defence Ministry said on Thursday, and reiterated that any building work was mainly for civilian purposes.

    China, which claims most of the resource-rich region, has carried out land reclamation and construction on several islands in the Spratly archipelago, parts of which are also claimed by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam.

    The building has included airports, harbors and other facilities, involving in some cases the dumping of massive amounts of sand to build up land on what were reefs or structures that may only have been exposed at low tide.

    But ministry spokesman Wu Qian implied that was perhaps a misunderstanding, though he said there was construction work which China had every right to do as the Spratlys were inherent Chinese territory.

    “There is no such thing as man-made islands,” Wu told a regular monthly news briefing. “Most of the building is for civilian purposes, including necessary defensive facilities.”

    The South China Sea is generally stable at present, but some countries outside the region are anxious about this and want to hype things up and create tensions, Wu said, using terminology that normally refers to the United States.

    Pressed to explain his comment that were no man-made islands, Wu declined to elaborate, saying China had already provided a full explanation of its construction work.

    On Monday, a U.S. think tank said China appeared to have largely completed major construction of military infrastructure on artificial islands it has built in the South China Sea and can now deploy combat planes and other military hardware there at any time.

    China has repeatedly denied charges it is militarizing the South China Sea, through which about $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year.

    news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.” data-reactid=”26″>For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

    (Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

    Originally posted here:

    China says 'no such thing' as man-made islands in South China Sea

    Kentucky lawyer pleads guilty in massive disability scheme

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A flamboyant Kentucky lawyer who billed himself as “Mr. Social Security” pleaded guilty Friday for his role in what prosecutors portrayed as a long-running scheme to defraud the government of nearly $600 million in federal disability payments.

    Eric C. Conn pleaded guilty in federal court in Lexington to stealing from the Social Security Administration and bribing a federal judge. The man who lived in a palatial eastern Kentucky home and was a frequent world traveler faces up to 12 years in prison at his July 14 sentencing.

    “I’m stunned,” said Ned Pillersdorf, an attorney who is representing hundreds of Conn’s former clients who have sued in seeking damages from Conn.

    Federal prosecutors claimed Conn raked in millions of dollars by paying a doctor and a judge to rubber-stamp false disability claims using phony medical evidence.

    Conn, 56, pleaded guilty to one count of theft of government money and one count of payment of gratuities. His legal team did not immediately respond to calls seeking comment.

    Conn opened his law practice in a trailer in 1993 in his hometown of Stanville, Kentucky, building it into one of the nation’s most lucrative disability firms. He became a local celebrity for his over-the-top advertising campaigns. He dispatched crews of “Conn Hotties” to events and had a 19-foot replica of the Lincoln Memorial erected in the parking lot of his office.

    He faced 18 counts in an indictment last year that also named a Social Security administrative law judge and a clinical psychologist.

    According to the plea, Conn participated in a more than decade-long scheme involving the submission of thousands of falsified medical documents to the Social Security Administration. Those fraudulent submissions resulted in payment of more than $550 million in benefits, it said.

    Conn also admitted to paying the judge about $10,000 a month over more than six years to award disability benefits in more than 1,700 cases, according to documents filed with the guilty plea. Those payments were based on falsified medical documents, the documents said.

    Conn admitted that he received more than $5.7 million in representative fees from the SSA based on those fraudulent claims, the documents said.

    Until his arrest, Conn had faced no legal consequences for years, even after the SSA had cut off disability payments to hundreds of his clients in the impoverished coalfields of eastern Kentucky and West Virginia.

    Conn’s clients have been fighting the federal government to keep their disability checks. Pillersdorf said that Conn’s guilty plea is unlikely to have an impact on those cases

    But Pillersdorf said the plea should help speed up consideration of the lawsuit in which hundreds of those former clients are seeking damages from Conn.

    “I’ve got to get these people money quick,” Pillersdorf said. “I’ve got 800 people going without, and it’s a real humanitarian crisis. His guilty plea should expedite that process.”

    As part of the fallout from Conn’s downfall, the Social Security Administration identified about 1,500 beneficiaries, mostly in eastern Kentucky, who could receive hearings to determine if their benefits should be reinstated, he said. The agency decided not to cut off those payments during that process after Republican U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers interceded.

    Now, those hearings are nearly complete, and so far about 800 have lost their benefits, Pillersdorf said.

    ___

    Associated Press Writer Beth Campbell in Louisville contributed to this report.

    Read this article:

    Kentucky lawyer pleads guilty in massive disability scheme

    Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor